FRONT PAGE AMPYRA AUBAGIO AVONEX BETASERON COPAXONE EXTAVIA
Stan's Angels MS News Channel on YouTube GILENYA NOVANTRONE REBIF RITUXAN TECFIDERA TYSABRI
 Daily News for Neuros, Nurses & Savvy MSers: 208,152 Viewers, 8,368 Stories & Studies
Click Here For My Videos, Advice, Tips, Studies and Trials.
Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
Click here to read my columns
Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
CLICK ON THE RED BUTTON BELOW
You'll get FREE Breaking News Alerts on new MS treatments as they are approved
MS NEWS ARCHIVES: by week

HERE'S A FEW OF OUR 6000+ Facebook & MySpace FRIENDS
Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


Click to view 1280 MS Walk photos!

"MS Can Not
Rob You of Joy"
"I'm an M.D....my Mom has MS and we have a message for everyone."
- Jennifer Hartmark-Hill MD
Beverly Dean

"I've had MS for 2 years...this is the most important advice you'll ever hear."
"This is how I give myself a painless injection."
Heather Johnson

"A helpful tip for newly diagnosed MS patients."
"Important advice on choosing MS medication "
Joyce Moore


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Saturday

 

Chemicals in sunscreen found to inhibit MS in mice
































Demyelination by MS. The CD68 colored tissue shows several macrophages in the area of the lesion. Original scale 1:100. Credit: Marvin 101/Wikipedia

A team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin has found that applying certain types of sunscreen to mice with an MS-like condition dissipated the symptoms of the condition. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes accidentally discovering the impact of sunscreen on mice and what testing of their results showed.

MS is an autoimmune demyelinating disease that results in nerve damage in people—the immune system, for unknown reasons, attacks the fatty material (called myelin) that insulates nerves. Symptoms include problems with vision, muscle movement, sensation and coordination. Scientists still do not know why it occurs and there is no known cure. In this new effort, the researchers found that two compounds common in sunscreen caused such symptoms to disappear in test mice.

The researchers describe investigating the possibility of using one or more wavelengths of light as a means of alleviating MS symptoms. To test their ideas, they induced an MS-like condition in multiple mice and then shaved their backs to allow for exposure to sunscreen and/or different wavelengths of light. They found that those mice with a coat of sunscreen, which were intended as the study's controls, showed reduced signs of MS symptoms. Intrigued, the researchers looked more closely at the sunscreens, sorting out which ingredients might be the cause of the reduction in symptoms. They found two: octisalate and homosalate—both resulted in reductions of MS symptoms when applied alone to test mice.

The researchers do not know why the two compounds have an impact on MS conditions in mice, nor do they know if they might have a similar impact on people with MS, but expect future research to find out (it is also likely that some MS patients may begin to apply sunscreen themselves upon hearing of the results of the study). In the meantime, they suggest it might be connected to the compounds causing the mice to produce less cyclooxygenase—an enzyme very often found in the lesions MS produces.

Abstract
UV light suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a widely used animal model of MS, in mice and may be responsible for the decreased incidence of MS in equatorial regions. To test this concept further, we applied commercially available sunblock preparations to mice before exposing them to UV radiation. Surprisingly, some of the sunblock preparations blocked EAE without UV radiation. Furthermore, various sunblock preparations had variable ability to suppress EAE. By examining the components of the most effective agents, we identified homosalate and octisalate as the components responsible for suppressing EAE. Thus, salates may be useful in stopping the progression of MS, and may provide new insight into mechanisms of controlling autoimmune disease.

Source: The above story is based on materials provided by MEDICALXPRESS
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length
Click here to read original article

Labels:



Go to Newer News Go to Older News