FRONT PAGE AMPYRA AUBAGIO AVONEX BETASERON COPAXONE EXTAVIA
Stan's Angels MS News Channel on YouTube GILENYA NOVANTRONE REBIF RITUXAN TECFIDERA TYSABRI
 Daily News for Neuros, Nurses & Savvy MSers: 208,152 Viewers, 8,368 Stories & Studies
Click Here For My Videos, Advice, Tips, Studies and Trials.
Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
Click here to read my columns
Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
CLICK ON THE RED BUTTON BELOW
You'll get FREE Breaking News Alerts on new MS treatments as they are approved
MS NEWS ARCHIVES: by week

HERE'S A FEW OF OUR 6000+ Facebook & MySpace FRIENDS
Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


Click to view 1280 MS Walk photos!

"MS Can Not
Rob You of Joy"
"I'm an M.D....my Mom has MS and we have a message for everyone."
- Jennifer Hartmark-Hill MD
Beverly Dean

"I've had MS for 2 years...this is the most important advice you'll ever hear."
"This is how I give myself a painless injection."
Heather Johnson

"A helpful tip for newly diagnosed MS patients."
"Important advice on choosing MS medication "
Joyce Moore


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Friday

 

Nose2Brain: Better therapy for multiple sclerosis


























Image Source: YALE

Medically active substances are normally distributed via the blood -- either directly by injection into the bloodstream or indirectly, for example through the digestive tract after oral administration. In many diseases, however -- for example of the central nervous system -- it is of decisive importance to transport the active substance as efficiently as possible to the required target site. An example of this is the treatment of MS, where the pharmaceutical agents have to produce their effect above all in the central nervous system. However, this is especially difficult to achieve in the usual way via the blood due to special protective mechanisms such as the blood-brain barrier.

Through the nose direct into the brain

Within the scope of the EU-funded "N2B patch" cooperative project, Fraunhofer IGB is therefore participating in the development of a medical form of therapy that delivers the drug via the Regio olfactoria. The aim of this alternative approach is to enable an active substance to circumvent the path through the bloodstream and to reach the brain directly. Here the brain, together with the surrounding liquid, is only separated from the nasal cavity by the ethmoid bone and some cell layers. The active agent can easily penetrate this barrier and reach the brain directly taking a short route. The therapeutic system will consist of the active agent itself, of a formulation containing the active agent, a hydrogel as carrier material for the formulation, and a suitable applicator for inserting the patch in the nose. The active agent is a biomolecule that stimulates the regeneration of nerve cells.

In the project the scientists at Fraunhofer IGB are concentrating on the formulation of the particles containing the active agent, and on inserting these particles into the gel. The project consortium is developing a special applicator to introduce the gel into the nose. The device is a combination of a standard endoscope and a special mixing system. This system is necessary as the target site is difficult to reach and an already solidified gel could not be deposited in the correct place. The liquid precursors of the gel therefore have to be transported separately to the olfactory epithelium inside the nose. There the various components combine to form a gel with the required consistency, so that the patch remains securely in place.

As the olfactory epithelium is difficult to reach, the gel patch should be applied by a doctor, not by the patients themselves. The active agent will then be released over an extended period of time, so there is then no need to remove the patch again. A new one is simply inserted in the case of long-term treatment.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by SCIENCEDAILY
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length


Go to Newer News Go to Older News