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Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
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Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
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Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
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Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


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Sunday

 

University of Maryland grad student restores movement to mice crippled with MS

















By Devin Garlit

Living with a chronic illness like MS involves adapting to a new way of life.  While some people like to say that MS “doesn’t have them”, I freely admit that it’s part of me.  That doesn’t mean it runs my life, it simply means that I’ve adapted the way I do some things.  With that in mind, I thought I’d take a look at some of the (sometimes weird) life hacks that I’ve adopted because of MS.  These are small things I do on a daily basis that make my life with MS go a little smoother.  Things that are routine to me, but still a little off-centered enough that I get asked about them.
Read more »

 

Managing the Emotional Side of MS



























The condition has a profound, lifelong emotional component that includes mood swings, anxiety and depression. (GETTY IMAGES)

Medical approaches and lifestyle changes can help keep anxiety and depression in check.
Read more »

Saturday

 

The Safety Profile of AUBAGIO (teriflunomide)‎ for MS treatment: VIDEO





















It’s important, Aaron Miller, MD Professor of Neurology and Medical Director of the Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for Multiple Sclerosis at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York said, to also look at the safety profile of the drug – these safety data in the TOPIC extension trial were very comparable to those that were seen in the pivotal phase 3 relapsing remitting trials.“These are generally very mild, and principally occur early in the course of treatment.”
Read more »

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New Survey Finds MS Patients Struggle with Misdiagnosis and Invisible Symptoms









This "MS in America 2017" infographic illustrates how multiple sclerosis can affect many aspects of a person's life.

PHILADELPHIA, PA --(Marketwired - April 27, 2017) - MS in America 2017, a national survey of more than 5,300 individuals diagnosed with MS, reveals many people initially received an improper diagnosis and have trouble finding an effective treatment.
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Friday

 

Parking Lot Life Lessons







Image Source: TURNITBLACK

By Emily Rhoades

“To speak, or not to speak; that was the question…” — Me, badly paraphrasing Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

Not long ago, I encountered a situation at the corner of Multiple Sclerosis and Moral Dilemma that required a quick decision without much time to reflect—a sketchy prospect for me even under the best of circumstances!  But this happened after one of “those” nights of particularly intense pain when I’d unfortunately missed the tiny window of opportunity to take medication in order to sleep and reasonably function the next day free of side effects (“reasonable functioning” being especially important that weekend because I needed to drop Oldest off at a basketball tournament before undertaking a 3-hour drive).  The next morning, I made several vulture-esque circles around the overflowing parking lot(s) before finally deciding on a handicap parking spots in front of the school gym.  After depositing Oldest with the team, I headed to the parking lot and passed a small group of his classmate and their parents, who happened to be closely followed by another man whom I recognized as the head coach of another basketball team from our town.  I’d heard he’d undergone some type of recent knee surgery, and he was using one of those “kneel and move along” kind of scooter apparatuses during his recovery and physical therapy.
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Nose2Brain: Better therapy for multiple sclerosis


























Image Source: YALE

Medically active substances are normally distributed via the blood -- either directly by injection into the bloodstream or indirectly, for example through the digestive tract after oral administration. In many diseases, however -- for example of the central nervous system -- it is of decisive importance to transport the active substance as efficiently as possible to the required target site. An example of this is the treatment of MS, where the pharmaceutical agents have to produce their effect above all in the central nervous system. However, this is especially difficult to achieve in the usual way via the blood due to special protective mechanisms such as the blood-brain barrier.
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Thursday

 

BREAKING: Gianforte Fired Someone for Having MS
























Republican Montana Congressional candidate Greg Gianforte settled a lawsuit from an employee that alleged he was fired after revealing he had MS.

Read more »

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Mayo Clinic Neurologist Explains Probable Cause of MS: VIDEO































In this video from the Mayo Clinic, neurologist Dr. Dean Wingerchuk explains that multiple sclerosis is a fairly common disease that affects around 400,000 people in the United States. MS tend to strike in early adulthood, with many patients first beginning to experience symptoms of the disease in their 20s and 30s.
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Wednesday

 

Real-world Data of Gilenya Treatment Validates Slowed Brain Shrinkage as Disease Progression Measure




















A real-world study of Gilenya (fingolimod) in relapsing MS confirms benefits of the treatment seen in clinical trials. The Novartis-sponsored study also demonstrated that measures of brain shrinkage can be used in a clinical setting to evaluate disease progression.
Read more »

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Treating Chronic Pain in MS























Several approaches can help to reduce chronic pain associated with MS.Masterfile; Alamy; Stocksy

Depending on the cause of your pain, stretching, Botox, or even dietary changes may help.

For many people who have multiple sclerosis (MS), living with the condition often means experiencing a certain amount of pain. This pain can take many forms, some of them short-lived.

Read more »

Tuesday

 

How To Beat The Heat This Summer





















By Calie Wyatt

Well guys, it’s almost that time of year again. The time of year I love, but my body hates—SUMMER. I live near the Dallas/Fort Worth area and it’s already heating up and humid as ever. If this heat is any indication of what the temperatures are going to be this summer, then I’m going to need to keep cool! I wanted to remind everyone of the effects heat can have on our MS riddled bodies, and what to do to avoid heat related exacerbations.
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A Step Closer to Unraveling Mystery Cause of MS


































A new study has made a major new discovery towards finding the cause of MS, potentially paving the way for research to investigate new treatments.
Read more »

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Monday

 

The drug is still new and not yet commercially available, but Dr. Boutwell hopes to get her hands on it in the next couple of months. (KCTV5) The drug is still new and not yet commercially available, but Dr. Boutwell hopes to get her hands on it in the next couple of months. (KCTV5)
























The drug is still new and not yet commercially available, but Dr. Boutwell hopes to get her hands on it in the next couple of months. (KCTV5)

A new drug is giving patients suffering from an aggressive form of MS new hope.
Read more »

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Drink Thyme Tea Every Morning To Help With Fibromyalgia, Hashimoto’s, Arthritis, Lupus, And MS























Besides garlic and turmeric, which are popular due to their medicinal properties, thyme is also an excellent herb which can be included in many different dishes and it has numerous health benefits as well.
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Sunday

 

The shower that ate me







It was three years since I’d seen my best mate Nigel. The last time had been when we said goodbye at London City Airport after our three-day sozzled sojourn (OK, drunken trip) round the Scottish Isle of Islay. To the uninitiated, a pilgrimage for those who worship peat in their dram of whiskey, but that is another story/column. Our wives met us airport arrivals, and were suitably impressed that we’d made it back.
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ME AND MS




























Author: Youtwohearts

We’ve had a turbulent relationship over the last 19 years to say it mildly. There have been many one-sided fights. I’ve told my story before but sometimes it’s worth repeating. My first MS attack (exacerbation) was severe. The entire left side of my body went numb and atrophied. I couldn’t walk, hold anything or feel on the left side. It came on fast starting in my foot on a Saturday and by the time I saw the doctor that Friday it was up to my face.  They had to rule out stroke because it was almost how it looked, except for my age, I was 26 years old. It was unlikely a stroke at that young age. The neurologist said, “does anyone in your family have MS?” I remember hearing the question, not understanding what that meant, just knowing it wasn’t good and crying. I was with my mom, at the doctor and when we were alone, through my tears, I ask “what is MS?”
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Saturday

 

Early Use of Tecfidera and Tysabri Improves MS Patients’ Outcomes, Studies Suggest

























The latest results on Tecfidera (dimethyl fumarate) and Tysabri (natalizumab) use in a clinical practice setting suggest that early treatment can improve outcomes in MS patients.
Read more »

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Sleep friendly apps for people with MS




By TK Sellman—April 19, 2017 

People with MS can benefit from the many new apps now available for download. Of particular value are the different kinds of apps that can help to track and manage nighttime sleep, daytime naps, and fatigue. Keeping track of your sleep can be useful in a number of ways. It can raise your own awareness of just how much sleep you actually get, which could be useful if you suspect you might have a sleep disorder in addition to your MS (and the odds are pretty good you might). Tracking your sleep can also be a great way to collect data about your sleep health while tracking your other symptoms so that you and your MS specialist can go over any symptom clusters or trends that might be revealed through your sleep patterns. You can also benefit from tracking the frequency and lengths of your naps, as well as keep notes on fatigue which can be compared against the sleep you had the night before, as a way to seek answers to any problems with exhaustion.
Read more »

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Friday

 

Woman With MS Won't Back Down When Congressman Tries To Avoid Her Question: VIDEO





















Healthcare is and always has been a hot-button issue in the United States, but with many Republicans eager to repeal the Affordable Care Act introduced by President Obama in 2010, the current situation is especially tense. Many citizens worry that whatever might replace the ACA won't adequately meet their needs, and for thousands, the concern is justified.
Read more »

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Medical history reveals MS begins to impact patients sooner




























UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

People with MS can show signs of something wrong five years before the onset of disease, much earlier than previously thought, according to a new analysis of health records from people with the condition.
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Thursday

 

Age at MS Diagnosis Varies by Latitude























By Trevis Gleason

At higher latitudes, MS is diagnosed two years earlier, on average.Which came first: better education of medical practitioners in a particular area of the world to look for symptoms of MS earlier, or the actual earlier onset of MS in that part of the world?
Read more »

 

No Evidence of Disease Activity Achieved in MS with Tecfidera (dimethyl fumarate)




Image Source: MEDSCAPE

Post hoc data analysis of the DEFINE and CONFIRM trials showed that a higher percentage of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) achieved no evidence of disease activity (NEDA) with delayed-release dimethyl fumarate (DMF) compared with placebo. The results were published in the European Journal of Neurology.1
Read more »

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Wednesday

 

Driving and Independence


























Image Source: YOUTUBE

By Matt Allen G

One of the major goals I have always associated with living with Multiple Sclerosis is “to try to keep as much independence as possible since MS tries to take it away”. Over the years MS has tried really hard to take away my independence in one way or another and I have tried really hard to hold on to it. Sometimes I managed to persevere and stay king of the hill but sometimes MS would take that title away from me and adjusting to that new reality would be difficult for me. I found that accepting that new reality was even more challenging. But I always managed until lately; lately I have been “stuck”. You see, I never really sat down and thought about how much of a blow to my independence losing the ability to drive would be so when I randomly lost it to a newly developed nystagmus I was completely unprepared. It was totally like not knowing how much you use something until you lose it! So now I am struggling to accept this new life where, as a 26-year-old male, I feel like I have been stripped of so much of my independence.
Read more »

 

Norwegian Researchers Analyze MS Life Expectancy, Survival and Mortality in 60-year Longitudinal Study






















A 60-year longitudinal MS study in a Norwegian cohort analyzing life expectancy, survival and mortality concluded that MS patients live shorter lives and have higher mortality than the general population.
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Tuesday

 

Address Primary Symptoms to Avoid Secondary Ones






















MS is a very complex disease that attacks the central nervous system. The symptoms MS generates are random, affect everyone differently, and are categorized either as primary MS, or secondary MS, symptoms.
Read more »

 

More MS-causing mutations found in Canadian families


























Carles Vilarino-Guell is an Assistant Professor of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia. Credit: Paul Joseph/UBC Faculty of Medicine

Less than a year after publishing research identifying a single genetic mutation that caused MS in two Canadian families, scientists at the University of British Columbia have found a combination of two other mutations in another family that made them highly susceptible to the disease.
Read more »

Monday

 

Oh, the Things You’ll See Over an MS Lifetime























I once wrote a toast for a dear couple who were to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary at the same island hotel where they had honeymooned — well, where they’d spent a weekend after their wedding. As I researched their life together, I realized that some pretty amazing stuff had taken place during the time they’d spent as a couple.
Read more »

 

The MS Alphabet: CIS, Copaxone, Contracture and More ‘C’ Terms






















When it comes to MS, mastering an understanding of the disease means you need to mind your Ps and Qs, dot your Is, cross your Ts, and recite your ABCs. There is so much to know about this complex disease. But the more you know as a patient, or caregiver, the more informed you will be in making critical healthcare decisions.
Read more »

Sunday

 

Why Staying Informed About MS is Important
























By Cathy Chester

A lot has changed in MS research and treatment since I was diagnosed 30 years ago. Here are a few things I was told originally that are no longer true:

  • There’s less than a 1% chance for a child to inherit their mother’s MS.
  • The first two years after diagnosis maps the course of the disease.
  • The greatest medicine is bedrest.
  • Yoga, tai chi, and meditation have no proven benefits for an MS patient.

I didn’t receive bad advice from my first neurologist. But, after looking back, it sounds off-the-wall and barbaric. Today’s research has changed the MS climate and newly diagnosed patients are, thankfully, the beneficiaries.
Read more »

 

Leaky Gut and MS























Image Source: Flickr

No one knows what causes MS. Throughout the world you’ll find as many theories on the causes of autoimmune diseases as you’ll find researchers.
Read more »

Saturday

 

The Romberg ratio in people with MS





























Image Source: LOMALINDAUNIVERSITYHEALTH

Postural control relies on the integration of inputs from the visual, somatosensory and vestibular systems which are frequently impaired in people with Multiple Sclerosis (PwMS).
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MRIs and Sir Peter Mansfield




























Sir Peter Mansfield
Image Source: NOTTINGHAM

By Laura Kolaczkowski

Do you know Peter Mansfield?  Don’t feel bad if you say no, because I didn’t either until a friend notified me of his recent passing.  It turns out he is a Nobel Laureate, having won the prize for medicine or physiology in 2003, for his work on understanding and developing the physics behind magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).  Most everyone with MS is personally familiar with the MRI because it is used for diagnosis of the disease and for tracking the progression.
Read more »

Friday

 

My Cognitive Changes Because Of MS
































Image Source: ELEARNINGINDUSTRY

By Devin Garlit

The list of symptoms that someone fighting MS might encounter is extremely long.  Over the years, I’ve written about many of the ones that impact my life.  Until today though, I haven’t gone into too much depth about the symptom that has been the scariest to me: cognitive problems.  Often referred to as “Cog Fog”, the cognitive problems that I’ve developed because of MS have had a profound impact on my life.
Read more »

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3D Laboratory Cell Growth System Should Speed Up MS Remyelination Research






















A physical scaffold that allows lab-grown brain cells to grow in a three-dimensional manner is giving scientists a whole new way of studying the regeneration of myelin, nerve coatings whose damage is at the heart of MS
Read more »

Thursday

 

I tried to diet my way out of MS. This is what I learned


























Juicing: not a wonder-drug


“Whatever you do, make sure you don’t go on any silly diets.” It was just about the first advice I was given by my neurologist, about 10 minutes after he’d confirmed that I had multiple sclerosis. It was the last thing I intended to do – unless it was a solid diet of pizza and chocolate, which I had been steadfastly adhering to ­during the misery of the diagnostic process. 
Read more »

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TripleFlex – An Innovative Device for MS Hip, Knee & Foot Drop: VIDEO




























Today was an interesting day…
I ran into a person with MS who I met last year at a local multiple sclerosis event.

She’d experienced numerous ambulation (walking) issues including foot drop, balance related problems due to her walking gait.  When I first saw her I was like, “I know her!” but it did not quite connect in my brain.  Then I remembered, she’d come to a local function and she arrived in a wheelchair.  Then she walked to her seat and one could not help but notice her impairment in ambulating.  After the event, we spoke for a little bit.  She’d tried various orthotics for the foot drop and numerous different types of bands and mechanisms to correct her gait.  She even had tried Ampyra which is a medication prescribed for MS patients to try and improve ambulation.  Needless to say, she’d had little success.

Read more »

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