FRONT PAGE AMPYRA AUBAGIO AVONEX BETASERON COPAXONE EXTAVIA
Stan's Angels MS News Channel on YouTube GILENYA NOVANTRONE REBIF RITUXAN TECFIDERA TYSABRI
 Daily News for Neuros, Nurses & Savvy MSers: 208,152 Viewers, 8,368 Stories & Studies
Click Here For My Videos, Advice, Tips, Studies and Trials.
Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
Click here to read my columns
Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
CLICK ON THE RED BUTTON BELOW
You'll get FREE Breaking News Alerts on new MS treatments as they are approved
MS NEWS ARCHIVES: by week

HERE'S A FEW OF OUR 6000+ Facebook & MySpace FRIENDS
Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


Click to view 1280 MS Walk photos!

"MS Can Not
Rob You of Joy"
"I'm an M.D....my Mom has MS and we have a message for everyone."
- Jennifer Hartmark-Hill MD
Beverly Dean

"I've had MS for 2 years...this is the most important advice you'll ever hear."
"This is how I give myself a painless injection."
Heather Johnson

"A helpful tip for newly diagnosed MS patients."
"Important advice on choosing MS medication "
Joyce Moore


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Friday

 

The Lowdown on Low-Dose Naltrexone for MS


























Small clinical studies have found that LDN reduces fatigue and depression in people with MS.Thinkstock

Can a drug developed to treat opioid addiction help you manage your MS symptoms?

Originally developed in the 1980s to treat people with alcohol and opioid (heroin and morphine) addiction, the drug naltrexone has received renewed interest as a complementary treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) symptoms, thanks to its unique way of working — and to the fact that it's generally safe, with few, if any, side effects.

A study published in February 2010 in the journal Annals of Neurology estimates that thousands of Americans with MS are using a regimen known as low-dose naltrexone (LDN), even though “there has been limited clinical study” of its safety and effectiveness in treating the condition, according to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

Testing an Idea

Around the time naltrexone was developed to reduce the effects of opioid drugs, researchers in the department of neural and behavioral sciences at Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, Pennsylvania began experimenting with the drug in mice, to see if its properties might make it useful in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by EVERYDAYHEALTH
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length


Go to Newer News Go to Older News