FRONT PAGE AMPYRA AUBAGIO AVONEX BETASERON COPAXONE EXTAVIA
Stan's Angels MS News Channel on YouTube GILENYA NOVANTRONE REBIF RITUXAN TECFIDERA TYSABRI
 Daily News for Neuros, Nurses & Savvy MSers: 208,152 Viewers, 8,368 Stories & Studies
Click Here For My Videos, Advice, Tips, Studies and Trials.
Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
Click here to read my columns
Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
CLICK ON THE RED BUTTON BELOW
You'll get FREE Breaking News Alerts on new MS treatments as they are approved
MS NEWS ARCHIVES: by week

HERE'S A FEW OF OUR 6000+ Facebook & MySpace FRIENDS
Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


Click to view 1280 MS Walk photos!

"MS Can Not
Rob You of Joy"
"I'm an M.D....my Mom has MS and we have a message for everyone."
- Jennifer Hartmark-Hill MD
Beverly Dean

"I've had MS for 2 years...this is the most important advice you'll ever hear."
"This is how I give myself a painless injection."
Heather Johnson

"A helpful tip for newly diagnosed MS patients."
"Important advice on choosing MS medication "
Joyce Moore


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Thursday

 

Living with Uncertainty is an MS Superpower






















MS IN MODERATION by Tamara Sellman

Recent weeks have been filled with enough political drama to last a lifetime. Wherever I go virtually (and now, even in “real life”), ideological division has been amplified to the extreme. Except … when I go to the MS online forum I co-administrate.

Meet the people in my neighborhood

The top posts recently, in summary, at that MS forum on Facebook were a pic collage blending images of making gumbo with uplifting messages and pictures of smiling faces, someone asking calmly about the side effects of Gilenya, an article about caregivers getting necessary sleep to do their good work,  a picture of an MS warrior T-shirt with typography that spells out “I’m fine,” and a John Muir quote: “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it hitched to the rest of the universe.”

The posts continued: A thoughtful question about choosing Gabapentin or Lyrica, a discussion about inclined bed therapy, an SOS from a patient struggling with orthopedic pain, a post about light therapy for seasonal affective disorder, and a question about differentiating worsening symptoms from relapse.

Notice the lack of hysteria? The positive, problem-solving attitudes? The desire to share information to help others? Even the SOS was written with a sense of humor.

It got me thinking: What is it about being chronically ill that might be useful for surviving these contentious times? What happens when we are diagnosed with MS or any other chronic, debilitating, incurable illness?

Stages of grief

In her book, On Death and Dying, Elizabeth Kübler-Ross identified five stages of grief. These are: Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, and Acceptance

We’ve all been through at least some of these stages. We may have cycled through all five at different times in our lives. Let’s face it: MS does, indeed, suck. It means we go to bed every night wondering what the next day will bring, knowing full well the best and worst answers to that speculation.

Living with MS means living with uncertainty. Some of us are much better at it than others. We all enter this new neighborhood at different times and with different coping mechanisms. There is no right or wrong way as much as there is simply a “way” we take to get through it.

We all have different variations of this snowflake disease, from mild to devastatingly progressive. And the symptoms! Endless variations on a theme of loss, pain and surrender.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by MULTIPLESCLEROSISNEWSTODAY
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length

Labels:



Go to Newer News Go to Older News