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Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
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Monday

 

Check For These Warning Signs Of MS





























MS is a devastating illness that might affect anyone, regardless of their gender, race or age. Multiple sclerosis is a disease wherein the body's immune system deteriorates and after that begins to harm the nervous system.

There is no remedy for the illness, but contemporary research is constantly underway to find new methods to not only treat the illness, but to eliminate it completely.

The symptoms and signs of multiple sclerosis can differ, based on what kind of nerve fibres and where within the body it starts to affect first.

1. Weakness:
Early signs of multiple sclerosis include numbness or weakness in various parts of the body. Usually, the weakness happens all on one single side of the body first or the lower parts of the body feel incredibly weak.

2. Numbness:
A person experiencing the early signals of multiple sclerosis also can develop loss of equilibrium and feel unsteady at times when they walk or perform any kind of somewhat strenuous activity. Numbness is an extremely common symptom of multiple sclerosis and at times an individual might experience numbness in the fingers, toes, hands or on the side of the face. Numbness may not remain; however, it may come and go in people who are in the first stages of the disease.

3. Sudden Paralysis Attack:
More unusual signs are sudden attack of paralysis, language that is not clear as well as the inability to coordinate while performing even small jobs.
  
4. Tingling Sensation:
A person might experience persistent tingling senses through parts of the body or pain in the limbs. Some people also develop muscle stiffness and even spasms. Even with over the counter medicines, the pain might not go away.

5. Lack Of Vision:
t has been noted that some patients start to experience partial or complete lack of vision in one single eye at a time or in both eyes or they might develop double vision.
  
6. Weak Bladder:
Multiple sclerosis can also result in a weak bladder. The urge to visit the bathroom becomes more. Sometimes a person suffering from multiple sclerosis may also suffer from incontinence.
  
7. Memory Loss:
Multiple sclerosis can also result in memory loss. You might have problems focusing or paying attention as this disease affects your nervous system.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by BOLDSKY
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length


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