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Tuesday

 

Us with MS – How Do People See Us?

















































Years before I was diagnosed with MS the administrator at my job  assumed one day that I had been drinking or that I was on something. My balance was a little off and I bumped into a wall right in front of her. I didn’t think anything of it because I had a tendency to be a little wobbly at times. She didn’t say anything to me and she gave no real indication that she even noticed. Strangely, the very next day I had to take a random drug test. Coincidence? I think not.

Thinking about that incident and her perspective of me made me begin to wonder what others see when they look at me or anyone else with MS.

From my perspective, there are more empathetic people in the world than not. Many people are kind to me. They open doors, make eye contact, or ask if they can do anything to help.

When I experience such kindness, it brightens my day and makes me feel good about the world I live in. I feel connected and respected. Most people I come into contact with  through the empathetic eyes of their experiences or the eyes of someone they know.

Some like to share that they have been in my shoes because of broken bones or surgeries. They can relate to being in the wheelchair or using a walker. They are curious about my story and when I tell them I have primary progressive multiple sclerosis their eyes show a deep compassion.

Empathetic or indifferent

 there is an opposite side to empathetic people — the indifferent ones that cannot relate to my situation at all.

Maybe they haven’t ever experienced health issues or haven’t been around anyone who has . As long as they are not mean or rude, their reaction can be understandable.

Mainly it’s in the grocery store that I find most people who fall into the latter category.

They are busy and hurrying so fast that they run circles around me, literally. It’s easy to feel I am in some kind of high-speed NASCAR race. They have to get in front of me no matter what, it seems. Even if it means they have to slide through a space too narrow to accommodate them.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by MULTIPLESCLEROSISNEWSTODAY
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length


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