FRONT PAGE AMPYRA AUBAGIO AVONEX BETASERON COPAXONE EXTAVIA
Stan's Angels MS News Channel on YouTube GILENYA NOVANTRONE REBIF RITUXAN TECFIDERA TYSABRI
 Daily News for Neuros, Nurses & Savvy MSers: 208,152 Viewers, 8,368 Stories & Studies
Click Here For My Videos, Advice, Tips, Studies and Trials.
Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
Click here to read my columns
Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
CLICK ON THE RED BUTTON BELOW
You'll get FREE Breaking News Alerts on new MS treatments as they are approved
MS NEWS ARCHIVES: by week

HERE'S A FEW OF OUR 6000+ Facebook & MySpace FRIENDS
Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


Click to view 1280 MS Walk photos!

"MS Can Not
Rob You of Joy"
"I'm an M.D....my Mom has MS and we have a message for everyone."
- Jennifer Hartmark-Hill MD
Beverly Dean

"I've had MS for 2 years...this is the most important advice you'll ever hear."
"This is how I give myself a painless injection."
Heather Johnson

"A helpful tip for newly diagnosed MS patients."
"Important advice on choosing MS medication "
Joyce Moore


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Friday

 

Research About Why Interferon Can Fail is Welcome


























I have made no secret of my distrust of the side effects from many of the disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) that are used mainly in the fight against relapsing MS. The fact that the most serious, albeit rare, side effects listed by the manufacturers of some drugs, include “death” is more than a little off-putting.

And, as if that is not bad enough, some drugs just don’t work with a large proportion of people with MS. Indeed, interferon-beta is said not to work for as many as half those who are treated with it.

The good news, though, is that researchers at Duke University in North Carolina, working with mice, seem to have discovered the reason.

Their study, “Mapping the Biology of Drug-Resistant Multiple Sclerosis,” has revealed biological mechanisms that can lead to a form of MS that doesn’t respond to the drug. What’s more, they have identified a new drug that might help MS patients for whom interferon-beta treatment fails.

I am not going into scientific details in this column; those who wish to do so can follow the link above. But it is good to see some progress is being made in this area.

Duke University associate professor of immunology Mari Shinohara, PhD, was a senior author of the study. She said: “The study shows a really clear molecular mechanism that may explain why some people do not respond to interferon-beta treatment. We’ve found what makes a difference in the response.

We found that, depending on which type of disease the mice had, we could choose the appropriate treatment,” she said.

Professor of medicine and molecular genetics and microbiology, at Duke, and a coauthor of the paper Simon Gregory, PhD, said: “We identified individuals who were not responsive to the interferon-beta treatment, and looked at their CXCR2 and LTBR relative gene expression levels.” They were found to be producing more of the receptors.

Researchers voiced concern about MS patients currently being failed by one of the several interferon-beta-branded drugs available.

Shinohara said: “Now these patients have to go through all the pain, inconvenience, and cost of interferon-beta treatment, only to be told that it doesn’t work for them. It’s a big problem, and it would be really nice if we could tell upfront which treatment works,” she said.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by MULTIPLESCLEROSISNEWSTODAY
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length


Go to Newer News Go to Older News