FRONT PAGE AMPYRA AUBAGIO AVONEX BETASERON COPAXONE EXTAVIA
Stan's Angels MS News Channel on YouTube GILENYA NOVANTRONE REBIF RITUXAN TECFIDERA TYSABRI
 Daily News for Neuros, Nurses & Savvy MSers: 208,152 Viewers, 8,368 Stories & Studies
Click Here For My Videos, Advice, Tips, Studies and Trials.
Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
Click here to read my columns
Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
CLICK ON THE RED BUTTON BELOW
You'll get FREE Breaking News Alerts on new MS treatments as they are approved
MS NEWS ARCHIVES: by week

HERE'S A FEW OF OUR 6000+ Facebook & MySpace FRIENDS
Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


Click to view 1280 MS Walk photos!

"MS Can Not
Rob You of Joy"
"I'm an M.D....my Mom has MS and we have a message for everyone."
- Jennifer Hartmark-Hill MD
Beverly Dean

"I've had MS for 2 years...this is the most important advice you'll ever hear."
"This is how I give myself a painless injection."
Heather Johnson

"A helpful tip for newly diagnosed MS patients."
"Important advice on choosing MS medication "
Joyce Moore


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Tuesday

 

High Doses of Vitamin D Unlikely to Help MS Patients, But Daily Low Dose Good for All, UK Group Says




























The Multiple Sclerosis Trust announced that the Vitamin D working group, part of the U.K. Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN), has published a 300-page, comprehensive report now recommending that anyone age 4 and older take 10 μg (400 IU) of vitamin D each day  to ensure musculoskeletal health.  The review, “Vitamin D and Health,” was conducted to assess whether the U.K. dietary recommendations, set in 1991, were still appropriate.

People with MS are not advised to take higher doses to treat the disease because of conflicting evidence regarding vitamin D supplements, the group said in a press release.

According to some neurologists, high doses of vitamin D supplements may be beneficial for MS patients. These  neurologists recommend that patients and their family members take around 100-124 μg (4000-5000 IU) of vitamin D every day (about 10 times the daily recommended dose for the general population), but others do not agree.

Research has shown that low levels of vitamin D are associated with the risk of developing MS, disease relapses, and increased disability. However, no causal role of vitamin D in reducing the risk or severity of MS has been seen. In fact, research studies to date have failed to produce any evidence showing that vitamin D supplements reduce the risk of developing MS or the severity of the condition. Most of these were observational studies and not randomized controlled trials, and produced inconsistent data between MS and vitamin D. Larger studies are ongoing to further investigate the potential benefits of vitamin D in MS. The MS Trust has a factsheet on vitamin D available for patients and others to download.

Vitamin D is essential to maintain muscle and bone health. Vitamin D is present in fish, eggs and fortified cereals, although in limited amounts, not enough to provide all the vitamin D that the body needs. Most of the vitamin D required for healthy muscles and bones is synthesized through sunlight on the skin.

According to Public Health England, most people get enough vitamin D through sunlight on their skin in the spring and summer seasons. During fall and winter, the agency — based on the working group’s findings — also recommends that people take 10 μg vitamin D supplements, and that they eat a healthy, balanced diet throughout the year.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by MULTIPLESCLEROSISNEWSTODAY
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length
Click here to read original article


Go to Newer News Go to Older News