FRONT PAGE AMPYRA AUBAGIO AVONEX BETASERON COPAXONE EXTAVIA
Stan's Angels MS News Channel on YouTube GILENYA NOVANTRONE REBIF RITUXAN TECFIDERA TYSABRI
 Daily News for Neuros, Nurses & Savvy MSers: 208,152 Viewers, 8,368 Stories & Studies
Click Here For My Videos, Advice, Tips, Studies and Trials.
Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
Click here to read my columns
Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
CLICK ON THE RED BUTTON BELOW
You'll get FREE Breaking News Alerts on new MS treatments as they are approved
MS NEWS ARCHIVES: by week

HERE'S A FEW OF OUR 6000+ Facebook & MySpace FRIENDS
Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


Click to view 1280 MS Walk photos!

"MS Can Not
Rob You of Joy"
"I'm an M.D....my Mom has MS and we have a message for everyone."
- Jennifer Hartmark-Hill MD
Beverly Dean

"I've had MS for 2 years...this is the most important advice you'll ever hear."
"This is how I give myself a painless injection."
Heather Johnson

"A helpful tip for newly diagnosed MS patients."
"Important advice on choosing MS medication "
Joyce Moore


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Thursday

 

Immunologic Effects of Metformin and Pioglitazone Treatment on Metabolic Syndrome and MS: STUDY

































Image Source: LOOKFORDIAGNOSIS



Abstract

Importance :
Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is thought to influence several autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Anti-inflammatory effects of treatments used for MetS, such as metformin hydrochloride and pioglitazone hydrochloride, have been demonstrated, although clinical evidence supporting use of these treatments in MS is lacking.

Objectives:
 To determine whether metformin and/or pioglitazone are associated with a reduction in disease activity as measured by brain magnetic resonance imaging in patients with MS and MetS and to evaluate the potential mechanisms underlying this anti-inflammatory effect.

Design, Setting, and Participants:
A prospective cohort study was conducted from March 1, 2012, to December 30, 2014, at a private MS referral center among 50 obese patients with MS who also developed MetS. Twenty patients received metformin hydrochloride, 850 to 1500 mg/d, and 10 patients received pioglitazone hydrochloride, 15 to 30 mg/d; 20 untreated patients served as controls. Groups were comparable in terms of sex, age, body mass index, Expanded Disability Status Scale score, disease duration, annual relapse rate, and treatment status. Patients were followed up for a mean (SD) of 26.7 (2.7) months (range, 24-33 months).

Main Outcomes and Measures:
Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed at 6-month intervals, and the presence of new or enlarging T2 lesions or gadolinium-enhancing lesions was registered. Serum leptin and adiponectin levels were measured. The production of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells was assayed, as were regulatory T-cell numbers and function.

Results:
Of 50 patients, after 6 months of treatment, 20 patients with MS who were treated with metformin and 10 who received pioglitazone showed a significant decrease in the number of new or enlarging T2 lesions (metformin, 2.5 at study entry to 0.5 at month 24; pioglitazone, 2.3 at study entry to 0.6 at month 24), as well as of gadolinium-enhancing lesions (metformin, 1.8 at study entry to 0.1 at month 24; pioglitazone, 2.2 at study entry to 0.3 at month 24). Compared with controls, both treatments led to a decrease in mean (SD) leptin levels (metformin, 5.5 [2.4] vs 10.5 [3.4] ng/mL, P < .001; pioglitazone, 4.1 [0.8] vs 11.0 [2.6] ng/mL, P < .001) and increase in mean (SD) adiponectin serum levels (metformin, 15.4 [5.5] vs 4.5 [2.4] μg/mL, P < .001; pioglitazone, 12.6 [3.6] vs 4.8 [0.6] μg/mL, P < .001). Mean (SD) number of myelin basic protein peptide–specific cells secreting interferon γ and interleukin (IL)–17 were significantly reduced in patients receiving metformin compared with controls (interferon γ, 30.3 [11.5] vs 82.8 [18.8], P < .001; IL-17, 212.4 [85.5] vs 553.8 [125.9], P < .001). Patients treated with pioglitazone showed significant decreases in the mean (SD) number of myelin basic protein peptide–specific cells secreting IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor compared with controls (IL-6, 361.6 [80.5] vs 1130.7 [149.21], P < .001; tumor necrosis factor, 189.9 [53.4] vs 341.0 [106.0], P < .001). Both metformin and pioglitazone resulted in a significant increase in the number and regulatory functions of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells compared with controls (metformin, 6.7 [1.5] vs 2.1 [1.0], P = .001; pioglitazone, 6.9 [0.8] vs 3.0 [0.8], P = .001).

Conclusions and Relevance:
Treatment with metformin and pioglitazone has beneficial anti-inflammatory effects in patients with MS and MetS and should be further explored.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by JAMANETWORK
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length

Labels:



Go to Newer News Go to Older News