FRONT PAGE AMPYRA AUBAGIO AVONEX BETASERON COPAXONE EXTAVIA
Stan's Angels MS News Channel on YouTube GILENYA NOVANTRONE REBIF RITUXAN TECFIDERA TYSABRI
 Daily News for Neuros, Nurses & Savvy MSers: 208,152 Viewers, 8,368 Stories & Studies
Click Here For My Videos, Advice, Tips, Studies and Trials.
Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
Click here to read my columns
Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
CLICK ON THE RED BUTTON BELOW
You'll get FREE Breaking News Alerts on new MS treatments as they are approved
MS NEWS ARCHIVES: by week

HERE'S A FEW OF OUR 6000+ Facebook & MySpace FRIENDS
Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


Click to view 1280 MS Walk photos!

"MS Can Not
Rob You of Joy"
"I'm an M.D....my Mom has MS and we have a message for everyone."
- Jennifer Hartmark-Hill MD
Beverly Dean

"I've had MS for 2 years...this is the most important advice you'll ever hear."
"This is how I give myself a painless injection."
Heather Johnson

"A helpful tip for newly diagnosed MS patients."
"Important advice on choosing MS medication "
Joyce Moore


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Sunday

 

MS Patients Asked to Take Part in Survey of Risk/Benefit Considerations in Choosing Treatments




























Image Source: EMPLOYERBIITY

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society is funding a new survey to understand how people living with multiple sclerosis (MS) weigh risks against benefits when choosing MS therapies. The survey was developed by Dr. Robert Fox, a neurologist, working with colleagues at the Cleveland Clinic and the MS patient registry NARCOMS.

MS is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. It has no cure, and treatment typically focuses on speeding recovery from attacks, slowing disease progression, and managing symptoms.

According to a National MS Society news release, while the risks and benefits of MS therapies are established, there is a lack of knowledge about how these factors are evaluated and perceived by people living with the disease. A clearer understanding of patient tradeoff decisions is crucial to clinicians, the healthcare industry, and regulators such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), when considering which therapies to develop, approve for use, and recommend.

The large-scale survey regarding preferences related to MS therapies, developed by the research  team, is looking for patterns in a person’s risk/benefit analysis based on health status and other factors.

Anyone with MS can take part in the survey, which takes about 20 minutes to complete, and includes questions related to the disease, its therapies, and personal characteristics. The survey also includes many clinical scenarios, complemented by questions related to patients’ openness to risks in each scenario. In addition, the survey asks for opinions regarding the possibility of MS patient involvement in the government’s review of new therapies.

To participate in the Multiple Sclerosis Risk Tolerance Survey, click here.

The Multiple Sclerosis Foundation estimates that more than 400,000 people in the United States, and about 2.5 million people around the world, have MS. About 200 new cases are diagnosed each week in the U.S. The ratio of women to men with the disease is about 2 to 1.

MS is not considered an inherited disorder, but researchers believe there may be a genetic predisposition to developing it. An estimated 15 percent of individuals with MS have one or more family members or relatives with the disease.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by MULTIPLESCLEROSISNEWSTODAY
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length


Go to Newer News Go to Older News