FRONT PAGE AMPYRA AUBAGIO AVONEX BETASERON COPAXONE EXTAVIA
Stan's Angels MS News Channel on YouTube GILENYA NOVANTRONE REBIF RITUXAN TECFIDERA TYSABRI
 Daily News for Neuros, Nurses & Savvy MSers: 208,152 Viewers, 8,368 Stories & Studies
Click Here For My Videos, Advice, Tips, Studies and Trials.
Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
Click here to read my columns
Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
CLICK ON THE RED BUTTON BELOW
You'll get FREE Breaking News Alerts on new MS treatments as they are approved
MS NEWS ARCHIVES: by week

HERE'S A FEW OF OUR 6000+ Facebook & MySpace FRIENDS
Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


Click to view 1280 MS Walk photos!

"MS Can Not
Rob You of Joy"
"I'm an M.D....my Mom has MS and we have a message for everyone."
- Jennifer Hartmark-Hill MD
Beverly Dean

"I've had MS for 2 years...this is the most important advice you'll ever hear."
"This is how I give myself a painless injection."
Heather Johnson

"A helpful tip for newly diagnosed MS patients."
"Important advice on choosing MS medication "
Joyce Moore


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Tuesday

 

New Study Explores Brain Damage in MS Patients with Autoimmune Comorbidities




















People with multiple sclerosis (MS) who also suffer from other autoimmune conditions, like thyroid disease or diabetes, have more severe brain damage than MS patients without comorbidities, according to a study from the University at Buffalo. The study was recently published in the American Journal of Neuroradiology.

An earlier report from the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis suggested that MS patients with additional diseases have an increased risk for disability progression. Researchers had earlier established that there is an association between cardiovascular disease and lesion load in MS, but the impact of other conditions on disease progression is not known.

The study, “Autoimmune Comorbidities Are Associated with Brain Injury in Multiple Sclerosis,“ analyzed the medical records of 815 MS patients, of whom 241 had comorbid conditions and 574 did not. Most had one comorbid disease, but 42 had two or more conditions in addition to MS. The research team analyzed comorbid disease in relation to measures of brain tissue injury acquired by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

The most frequently encountered conditions were thyroid disease, present in 11.9 percent of these MS patients, followed by asthma, type 2 diabetes mellitus, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Brain tissue injury in these patients was localized to gray matter, particularly to the cortex, the team found. Psoriasis, thyroid disease, and type 2 diabetes — all conditions with an autoimmune component — were specifically associated with more severe MRI outcomes.

In addition to analyzing conventional lesion load, the team looked at data of unconventional MRI measures, such as brain atrophy, magnetization transfer imaging, and diffusivity. Researchers noted that evidence of brain tissue damage was found mostly with the unconventional techniques, and that an association between comorbidities and brain injury might, therefore, not be detected using only lesion burden MRI measures.

Although the team found a link between three autoimmune conditions and brain injury, researchers did not analyze all comorbidities present because of the limited number of patients. It is possible that also other conditions, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes mellitus, Crohn’s disease, and myasthenia gravis are also associated with more severe brain injury in MS.

Since the study analyzed only the presence of comorbidities and brain injury in a cross-sectional manner, the team could not conclude that the comorbidities caused an accelerated disease progression. More research is needed to establish the nature of these relationships.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by MULTIPLESCLEROSISNEWSTODAY
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length































Labels:



Go to Newer News Go to Older News