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Monday

 

Holistic clinic used by the Royals is probed over 'dangerous' ads which claim its natural therapies can cure MS and Parkinson's
































The Hale Clinic (pictured) in West London was opened by Prince Charles in 1988 and boasts that it has 'the widest range of holistic treatments in Europe'

  • Hale Clinic in London boasts 'widest range of holistic treatments in Europe'
  • Clients have included the late Princess Diana and the Duchess of Cornwall
  • Advertising Standards Authority looking at 'misleading' claims by clinic
  • It claimed one type of massage 'can be of great assistance… after a stroke'

A natural health clinic whose clients include members of the Royal Family has been slammed for making 'potentially dangerous' claims about its alternative therapies.

The Hale Clinic in West London was opened by Prince Charles in 1988 and boasts that it has 'the widest range of holistic treatments in Europe'.

Princess Diana and the Duchess of Cornwall have visited the clinic, while Kate Middleton was given a 'bee sting facial' by one of its beauty therapists, Deborah Mitchell, shortly before her marriage to Prince William.

But the Advertising Standards Authority is now taking a close look at what scientists say are 'misleading' claims by the clinic on its website that its treatments can help combat a variety of serious illnesses.

However, many of those claims were removed after The Mail on Sunday contacted the clinic.
       
The Good Thinking Society, which aims to crack down on 'quack' medicine, has presented a dossier to the ASA about assertions made by the clinic, which has also treated celebrities such as Kylie Minogue and Simon Cowell.
      
The report accuses the clinic of claiming that 'the Hale Approach' has the potential to cure people of the savage neurodegenerative disease multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease sufferers should use 'complementary treatments' as they are 'far more likely to be beneficial than orthodox drugs'.

The clinic also claimed homeopathy and a type of massage called cranial osteopathy 'can be of great assistance… immediately after a stroke' and that the causes of autism in children can be diagnosed with 'bioenergetics' and treated with homeopathy.

Michael Marshall, director of The Good Thinking Society, said: 'We believe the Hale Clinic is making a large number of misleading and potentially dangerous health claims.

'The kind of advice this clinic is giving is likely to lead vulnerable, sick patients with serious illnesses to make costly and dangerous decisions.'

Among the most striking claims made by the clinic is that 'complementary medical opinion should be considered first line' – in other words, before all others – to treat multiple sclerosis, 'since these [complementary] therapies are aiming at a cure, whereas orthodox treatments deal with the symptoms and hope for a remission'.

The Mail on Sunday, which took screen grabs of the web pages on which the claims were made, approached The Hale Clinic for comment on Friday.
Subsequently the most contentious claims were removed. Clinic director Teresa Hale said yesterday she was 'unable to find the more serious allegations on our website'.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by DAILYMAIL
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length

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