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Tuesday

 

A New Online Tool To Help Us Reduce Our Stress

































By Cathy Chester

I recently read an article that Shift.ms (the social network dedicated to helping people with multiple sclerosis) is testing a tool to help us de-stress. The test is for a new tool that could help us manage our disease through CBT, also known as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. This online tool would be the first of its kind.

According to Psychology Today CBT is, “a form of psychotherapy that treats problems and boosts happiness by modifying dysfunctional emotions, behaviors, and thoughts. Unlike traditional Freudian psychoanalysis, which probes childhood wounds to get at the root causes of conflict, CBT focuses on solutions, encouraging patients to challenge distorted cognitions and change destructive patterns of behavior.”

What that boils down to is a way of helping us manage the stress of living with an unpredictable disease. CBT teaches us to replace negative thoughts with positive ones. How we think and feel is directly connected to our experiences and actions, and with CBT we can be kinder to ourselves as we deal with our disease.

That’s the whole point of Shift.ms creating this new and exciting tool. It’s for us to be able to learn to be “kind to our mind” by using a tool to help us reframe our thoughts.

If CBT can help us live a better quality of life then why not try it?

According to the Shift.ms website their CBT tool, named Thought Sort, is explained this way:

“We all have a big jumbled mess of thoughts in our minds. Feelings of being sad, mad or frustrated can creep in – that’s natural. We jump from one thought to the next and don’t often give ourselves space to think about them. Tackling your thoughts alone can be hard.

Thought Sort will help you recognise negative feelings early on and learn to understand what is fueling them and adapt, with a helping hand from the Shift.ms community.”

Shift.ms is looking to recruit more MSers for their study but you must be part of the shift.ms community:

“Users who sign up to ‘Thought Sort’ between February and April 2016 can be part of a research study carried out by University College London. The evaluation will review the response to the tool and its impact on people recently diagnosed with MS.”~Shift.ms

I adore Shift.ms and have long admired what they do for our community. I urge you to check out their website and take a look at Thought Short. You’ll be glad you did!

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by MULTIPLESCLEROSIS.NET
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length
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