FRONT PAGE AMPYRA AUBAGIO AVONEX BETASERON COPAXONE EXTAVIA
Stan's Angels MS News Channel on YouTube GILENYA NOVANTRONE REBIF RITUXAN TECFIDERA TYSABRI
 Daily News for Neuros, Nurses & Savvy MSers: 208,152 Viewers, 8,368 Stories & Studies
Click Here For My Videos, Advice, Tips, Studies and Trials.
Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
Click here to read my columns
Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
CLICK ON THE RED BUTTON BELOW
You'll get FREE Breaking News Alerts on new MS treatments as they are approved
MS NEWS ARCHIVES: by week

HERE'S A FEW OF OUR 6000+ Facebook & MySpace FRIENDS
Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


Click to view 1280 MS Walk photos!

"MS Can Not
Rob You of Joy"
"I'm an M.D....my Mom has MS and we have a message for everyone."
- Jennifer Hartmark-Hill MD
Beverly Dean

"I've had MS for 2 years...this is the most important advice you'll ever hear."
"This is how I give myself a painless injection."
Heather Johnson

"A helpful tip for newly diagnosed MS patients."
"Important advice on choosing MS medication "
Joyce Moore


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Sunday

 

Ask The Doc - MS

























Image Source: MRWALLPAPER

Question: How does the winter affect Multiple Sclerosis?

By Sarah Kailhofer, Clinical Nurse, Columbia St. Mary’s

Many people who are diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are aware of how their symptoms are impacted during warm weather. But many are often unaware that MS is also often affected by the cold.

A common symptom experienced by patients with MS is spasticity. Spasticity is a condition characterized by muscle stiffness and, sometimes, sudden muscular contractions. It can be very uncomfortable and can impair a person’s ability to move. Winter is a time when patients often experience an increase in spasticity. Increased spasticity may also be triggered by other conditions such as high humidity, poor posture or an illness, such as the cold or flu.

If you are experiencing increased spasticity, there are several things you can do. One important health activity for all MS patients is maintaining a regular exercise program to maintain strength and flexibility. People who experience spasticity specifically benefit from an exercise program that includes stretching and strengthening exercises. Yoga and Tai Chi are excellent exercises for people with mobility limitations to increase their flexibility. These practices also emphasize mindfulness, which has the added benefit of stress reduction.

A physical therapist (PT) is also an excellent resource to assist with spasticity difficulties. A PT can not only make sure you are doing the right kind of exercises for your particular case, but they can also evaluate you to see if you would benefit from any braces or other assistive devices to help you maintain correct body mechanics and move around safely. Columbia St. Mary’s Sacred Heart Outpatient Rehabilitation Program has therapists available who are specially trained to work with patients who have MS and other neurological problems, such as Parkinson’s disease, traumatic brain injuries or stroke.

Medications may also be useful to help relax the spastic muscles. Some patients will need to take these medications regularly; others may need to use them only on an as-needed basis. Your neurologist can help determine which medication and dosage is appropriate.

Lastly, it’s important for all patients to remember that as winter sets in across Wisconsin, with icy conditions outside and the possibility of wet floors inside, slips and falls are far more prevalent. Pay close attention when walking on slippery surfaces, wear slip resistant footwear, and use any appropriate assistive devices you may need such as a cane or walker to maintain your balance.

For more information, please call the Columbia St. Mary’s Multiple Sclerosis Clinic at 414-585-1771.


This article appeared in the Thursday, January 14, issue of The Ozaukee News Graphic.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by COLUMBIASTMARYS
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length


Go to Newer News Go to Older News