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Huge breakthrough for MS patients thanks to 'game changing' drug that dramatically slows progression of the disease: VIDEO




A new drug for multiple sclerosis dramatically slows the progression of the disease. Described as a ‘game changer’ by scientists, ocrelizumab is the first ever drug shown to effectively treat the 10 per cent of patients with the primary progressive form of the disease (a brain with MS is pictured)

MS is the most common disabling neurological condition, with 50 people in Britain diagnosed each week, usually in their 20s or 30s.

  • Ocrelizumab is first ever drug shown to effectively treat the 10 per cent of patients with a form called primary progressive MS
  • For those with another form called relapsing MS - which affects 85 per cent of patients - it is nearly 50 per cent more effective than existing treatments
  • Experts hailed the drug as 'a game changer' for MS treatment
A breakthrough drug for multiple sclerosis dramatically slows the progression of the disease, scientists announced tonight.

The medication is the first ever treatment for people with a certain form of the MS – and for another 85,000 MS patients offers a far more effective alternative to existing drugs.

The drug, which was tested in hospitals across the UK in a huge clinical trial, offers hope for more than 2.3 million people worldwide with MS.

Described as a ‘game changer’ by scientists, ocrelizumab is the first ever drug to be shown to effectively treat the 10 per cent of MS patients with a form called primary progressive MS.

And for those with another form called relapsing MS - which affects 85 per cent of patients - it is nearly 50 per cent more effective than existing treatments.

The condition, which affects twice as many women as men, causes loss of mobility, sight problems, tiredness and excruciating pain.

The disease either become progressively worse with age - or strikes in brutal, periodic relapses - with many people left relying on wheelchairs.

The condition is caused when the body’s immune system malfunctions, and instead of warding off diseases turns instead to attack the body’s own nerves.

Certain immune cells, called B-cells, attack myelin, the protective sheath surrounding nerve fibres.

The ocrelizumab treatment slows down this process by stopping the B-cells from attacking the myelin.

The drug, taken as an intravenous drip every six months, was tested on 2,300 patients across the world as part of a large phase-three clinical trial involving in ten English hospitals.

The results from that trial was presented last night at the European Committee for Treatment Research in Multiple Sclerosis conference in Barcelona.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by DAILYMAIL
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length

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