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MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS PATIENTS NEED ACTIVE MANAGEMENT: REVIEW





















Advances in the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis have been good news for patients, but side effects and risks mean that an active management strategy and constant monitoring are essential.

These are the findings from a review of this common disease published online today by the Medical Journal of Australia and led by Professor Simon Broadley from Griffith University’s Menzies Health Institute Queensland.

Multiple sclerosis is the most common autoimmune disorder affecting the central nervous system and is thought to affect about one in every thousand people.

“The great news is that patients do not now have to think of an MS diagnosis as a lifetime in a wheelchair,” says Prof Broadley.

“Fortunately, there are now some very effective treatments which mean that this is no longer inevitability, and which can allow them to continue leading a normal life.

“However we do know that most of the newer, more effective therapies are associated with risks and practical problems that necessitate an active management strategy and continuous vigilance.

“All current treatments for MS have some minor side effects and several of the more potent agents are associated with specific risks that need to be managed,”.

“It is important to remain vigilant to potential late complications with some of the newer therapies.”

The review also states that monitoring for compliance is also vital, considering the long-term nature of MS therapies.

It states that: “General Practitioners and specialist physicians need to be aware of the potential complications and specific features of MS therapies, particularly in rural and remote settings where rapid access to specialist neurological services may not be available”.

Multiple Sclerosis does not have a cure as yet. However two years ago Prof Broadley, working under the umbrella of the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium, identified 48 previously unknown genetic variants that influence the risk of developing MS.

The discovery nearly doubled the number of known genetic risk factors and provides additional key insights into the biology of this debilitating neurological condition.

“Getting to the source of this terrible condition is a key focus for medical scientists around the world. This information is a significant step forward in unlocking the genetic code of the disease,” Prof Broadley said at the time.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by AUSTRALIANJOURNALOFPHARMACY
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length


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