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Monday

 

Woman Living With Multiple Sclerosis Still A Healthy Athlete: VIDEO































Joann Dickerson-Smith


More than 2-million people are living with Multiple Sclerosis worldwide, according to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

We met one 55-year-old athlete who is not letting the disease slow her down.
Holly Firfer has more in today's Health Minute.

Joann Dickerson-Smith is training for her fifth straight year at the National Veterans Wheelchair Games in Dallas.

"Most people think that I can't do it and I think that because they think I can't do it, I'm very competitive, I'm a closet athlete, I'm very competitive so I say yes I can," Dickerson-Smith says. "And I try it, if I can't do it then I try it until I get it."
This athlete's competitive spirit and positive attitude have helped her battle Multiple Sclerosis for 21 years now.

MS is a disease that makes the immune system attack nerves in the brain and spinal cord.

There's no cure, but keeping active can help.

"We love learning for people like Joann and using her as an example of how wellness and exercise in Multiple Sclerosis can help you maintain what you've got and maybe improve upon what you've got," says Dr. Ben Thrower of the Sheperd Center MS Institute. "Because I can guarantee you Joann wouldn't be doing as well as she is if she had a stationary lifestyle."

Joann says she's also inspired by her competition.

"I get my energy up because I know there're so many others that are preparing who have more disability than I do," she says. "And they come with such energy and everybody's happy, so it pumps me up knowing that I'm going to be with a group of people that have great energy."

More than 2-million people are living with Multiple Sclerosis worldwide, according to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

We met one 55-year-old athlete who is not letting the disease slow her down.
Holly Firfer has more in today's Health Minute.

Joann Dickerson-Smith is training for her fifth straight year at the National Veterans Wheelchair Games in Dallas.

"Most people think that I can't do it and I think that because they think I can't do it, I'm very competitive, I'm a closet athlete, I'm very competitive so I say yes I can," Dickerson-Smith says. "And I try it, if I can't do it then I try it until I get it."
This athlete's competitive spirit and positive attitude have helped her battle Multiple Sclerosis for 21 years now.

MS is a disease that makes the immune system attack nerves in the brain and spinal cord.

There's no cure, but keeping active can help.

"We love learning for people like Joann and using her as an example of how wellness and exercise in Multiple Sclerosis can help you maintain what you've got and maybe improve upon what you've got," says Dr. Ben Thrower of the Sheperd Center MS Institute. "Because I can guarantee you Joann wouldn't be doing as well as she is if she had a stationary lifestyle."

Joann says she's also inspired by her competition.

"I get my energy up because I know there're so many others that are preparing who have more disability than I do," she says. "And they come with such energy and everybody's happy, so it pumps me up knowing that I'm going to be with a group of people that have great energy."

More than 2-million people are living with Multiple Sclerosis worldwide, according to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

We met one 55-year-old athlete who is not letting the disease slow her down.
Holly Firfer has more in today's Health Minute.

Joann Dickerson-Smith is training for her fifth straight year at the National Veterans Wheelchair Games in Dallas.

"Most people think that I can't do it and I think that because they think I can't do it, I'm very competitive, I'm a closet athlete, I'm very competitive so I say yes I can," Dickerson-Smith says. "And I try it, if I can't do it then I try it until I get it."
This athlete's competitive spirit and positive attitude have helped her battle Multiple Sclerosis for 21 years now.

MS is a disease that makes the immune system attack nerves in the brain and spinal cord.

There's no cure, but keeping active can help.

"We love learning for people like Joann and using her as an example of how wellness and exercise in Multiple Sclerosis can help you maintain what you've got and maybe improve upon what you've got," says Dr. Ben Thrower of the Sheperd Center MS Institute. "Because I can guarantee you Joann wouldn't be doing as well as she is if she had a stationary lifestyle."

Joann says she's also inspired by her competition.

"I get my energy up because I know there're so many others that are preparing who have more disability than I do," she says. "And they come with such energy and everybody's happy, so it pumps me up knowing that I'm going to be with a group of people that have great energy."

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by WMFD
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length

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