FRONT PAGE AMPYRA AUBAGIO AVONEX BETASERON COPAXONE EXTAVIA
Stan's Angels MS News Channel on YouTube GILENYA NOVANTRONE REBIF RITUXAN TECFIDERA TYSABRI
 Daily News for Neuros, Nurses & Savvy MSers: 208,152 Viewers, 8,368 Stories & Studies
Click Here For My Videos, Advice, Tips, Studies and Trials.
Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
Click here to read my columns
Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
CLICK ON THE RED BUTTON BELOW
You'll get FREE Breaking News Alerts on new MS treatments as they are approved
MS NEWS ARCHIVES: by week

HERE'S A FEW OF OUR 6000+ Facebook & MySpace FRIENDS
Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


Click to view 1280 MS Walk photos!

"MS Can Not
Rob You of Joy"
"I'm an M.D....my Mom has MS and we have a message for everyone."
- Jennifer Hartmark-Hill MD
Beverly Dean

"I've had MS for 2 years...this is the most important advice you'll ever hear."
"This is how I give myself a painless injection."
Heather Johnson

"A helpful tip for newly diagnosed MS patients."
"Important advice on choosing MS medication "
Joyce Moore


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Tuesday

 

Retinal neuronal and axonal loss over time as markers of disease progression and activity in Multiple Sclerosis: A pilot study: STUDY
































ABSTRACT

Objective:
We examined how thinning of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL) over time reflects disease progression and activity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

Background:
Retinal axonal and neuronal loss has emerged as an important visual outcome measure in MS but the utility of these measures in clinical practice remains limited at a time when markers for disease progressive are acutely needed.

Design/Methods:
Seventy patients underwent baseline and follow-up testing with optical coherence tomography (OCT), brain MRIs and EDSS. Average eye outcomes were used. Linear regression models and chi square tests were used to compare outcomes.

Results:
At baseline and follow-up, 87[percnt] of patients had relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) and 11[percnt] had secondary progressive MS (SPMS). Mean baseline EDSS was 2.7 and mean follow-up was 2 years. One patient developed optic neuritis during follow-up, 57[percnt] and 71[percnt] of patients had thinning of their RNFL and GCL over the follow-up period, respectively. The mean annual rate of EDSS progression was 0.4. Patients with an accelerated rate of RNFL thinning (>2 microns) had greater EDSS progression (1.0 point compared to no thinning, p=0.016). Patients with accelerated GCL thinning had greater but not significant EDSS progression (0.5 points). Patients with RNFL and GCL thinning were 19[percnt] and 40[percnt] more likely to have new lesions on their follow-up brain MRI (p=0.078, p=0.011 respectively) and were slightly more likely to have experienced a relapse during follow-up (not significant). In the small subgroup without clinical or radiologic activity, patients with EDSS progression had a greater rate of RNFL thinning (1.5 microns) compared to patients without EDSS progression.

Conclusions:
Patients with a higher rate of RNFL and GCL thinning had greater disability progression. Longitudinal OCT metrics have a potential role in capturing disease progression notably in the absence of clinical or radiologic disease activity.

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by NEUROLOGY
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length

Labels:



Go to Newer News Go to Older News