FRONT PAGE AMPYRA AUBAGIO AVONEX BETASERON COPAXONE EXTAVIA
Stan's Angels MS News Channel on YouTube GILENYA NOVANTRONE REBIF RITUXAN TECFIDERA TYSABRI
 Daily News for Neuros, Nurses & Savvy MSers: 208,152 Viewers, 8,368 Stories & Studies
Click Here For My Videos, Advice, Tips, Studies and Trials.
Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
Click here to read my columns
Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
CLICK ON THE RED BUTTON BELOW
You'll get FREE Breaking News Alerts on new MS treatments as they are approved
MS NEWS ARCHIVES: by week

HERE'S A FEW OF OUR 6000+ Facebook & MySpace FRIENDS
Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


Click to view 1280 MS Walk photos!

"MS Can Not
Rob You of Joy"
"I'm an M.D....my Mom has MS and we have a message for everyone."
- Jennifer Hartmark-Hill MD
Beverly Dean

"I've had MS for 2 years...this is the most important advice you'll ever hear."
"This is how I give myself a painless injection."
Heather Johnson

"A helpful tip for newly diagnosed MS patients."
"Important advice on choosing MS medication "
Joyce Moore


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Wednesday

 

Multiple sclerosis theory fuels excitement, testing

(Posted By: Josi Creek)
Associated Press

Under intense pressure from patients, some doctors are cautiously testing a provocative theory that abnormal blood drainage from the brain may play a role in multiple sclerosis — and a surgical vein fix might help.

Labels:


 

D.C. sets monthly medical pot limit



The District would allow people to have up to 2 ounces of marijuana a month — enough for about a joint a day — for certain medical uses under a bill that moved closer to passage Tuesday.

The bill would not let patients grow their own marijuana, but a committee would study whether to allow home cultivation in the city and make a recommendation by 2012. The bill was approved by two city government committees. It still needs approval of the full D.C. Council to become law and could be approved as early as May.

Labels:


 

New study questions earlier conclusions about the kinetics of T cell receptors

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

T cell receptors are among the most important molecules in the immune system because of their role in recognizing the antigens that signal such threats as viruses and cancer. The receptors must also distinguish these threats from the body's own cells to avoid triggering an unwanted immune system response.

 

City researchers to test Multiple Sclerosis findings of Italian doctor

( Posted by-Desinie Smith)
In light of work done by an Italian researcher into the cause of multiple sclerosis, Dr. Katherine Knox and her team of researchers announced Tuesday they will put a controversial hypothesis to the test.

Labels:


 

Data from EMD Serono's Multiple Sclerosis Portfolio to be Presented at the 62nd Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )
EMD Serono, Inc., an affiliate of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, today announced that new data from the company's multiple sclerosis (MS) portfolio of approved and investigational treatments will be presented at the 62nd Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) taking place April 10 to 17, in Toronto, Canada.

Labels: ,


 

Interferons May NOT Be Good for Some People with MS

( Posted by: Desinie Smith)
Researchers at Stanford found that in people with relapsing-remitting ultiple sclerosis (RRMS), there seem to be 2 types: one type characterized by high levels of an immune cell called interleukin-17 (IL-17) in the blood and the other type with a low level of IL-17 in the blood. Turns out that the interferon-based disease modifying drugs (Avonex, Betaseron, Rebif) have different effects on people, depending on their level of circulating IL-17.

Labels: , , ,


 

Researchers find multiple sclerosis breakthrough

( Posted by Desinie Smith )
Stanford researchers published findings on Sunday indicating that there are two types of multiple sclerosis (MS) that respond differently to the most common drugs used today. These findings could have clinical applications for personalizing the current treatments for MS.
.

Labels:


 

Yale Researcher Receives AAN’s Dystel Prize for Multiple Sclerosis Research

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

TORONTO – The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is awarding the 2010 John Dystel Prize for Multiple Sclerosis Research to David A. Hafler, MD, with Yale University. Hafler will receive the award during the AAN’s 62nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, held April 10 through April 17, 2010.

The John Dystel Prize recognizes a significant contribution to research in the understanding, treatment, or prevention of multiple sclerosis.

Hafler’s research focuses on the immunologic and genetic underpinnings of multiple sclerosis. He hopes that using the newly discovered findings of the genes that causes MS will lead to new therapies. “To effectively cure a disease, a basic understanding of the disease’s cause is required,” says Hafler. “The sequencing of the human genome has finally allowed us to identify the genetic basis of the disease, revealing a commonality with other autoimmune diseases.”


To read the full story, click here.

Tuesday

 

(VIDEO) New Blood Test Predicts Efficacy of Multiple Sclerosis Drug Beta Interferon

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

A scientific breakthrough recently published in Nature Medicine may help patients with Multiple Sclerosis find out, with a simple blood test, whether they will respond to one of the leading drugs on the market today (beta interferon) or not. Dr. Larry Steinman, one of the co-authors of the paper, tells BioBusiness.TV how he and his team came to this discovery. When asked by analyst Michael King, about the EAE model used for the test, Dr. Steinman explains the difference between the IL1 and IL17 pathways that caused paralysis. When beta interferon was administered, paralysis was reversed in animals with IL1, and was made worse in animals with IL17. An independant study from the University of Amsterdam showed a correlation between the occurrence of relapses in MS and the presence of IL17 in the blood, which is fully congruent with the data found here in animal models.

This interview was conducted at the NASDAQ Marketsite, and is being broadcasted in conjunction with the release of Dr. Laurence Steinman's paper, published in Nature Medicine on March 28th, 2010



* Professor Laurence Steinman, Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences, Pediatrics, and (by courtesy) Genetics
* Michael G. King Jr., Wedbush PacGrow Life Sciences, Wedbush Morgan Securities, Managing Director - Equity Research, Biotechnology/Biopharmaceuticals

Source: http://www.biobusiness.tv/videos/334

Labels:


 

Travels With Your Doctor: The Diagnosis


( Posted by- Desinie Smith )

Based on the number of comments it received, the earlier post, “Is MS Really That Hard to Diagnose,” hit a raw nerve. No wonder. Stories of symptoms ignored or not recognized by doctors are legion.

Labels:


 

What's New on Multiple Sclerosis in PubMed

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )Graph theoretical analysis of structural and functional connectivity MRI in normal and pathological brain networks
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20349109

T helper type 1 and 17 cells determine efficacy of interferon-beta in multiple sclerosis and experimental encephalomyelitis
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20348925

Increased plasma C-reactive protein in a pregnant woman with multiple sclerosis: corticotherapy or not ?
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20348053

17beta-estradiol protects male mice from cuprizone-induced demyelination and oligodendrocyte loss
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20347981

Loss of epidermal growth factor regulation by cobalamin in multiple sclerosis
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20347721

Laquinimod suppress antigen presentation in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: In-vitro high-throughput gene expression study
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20347159

Multiple Sclerosis on Steroids
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20347108

Fumaric acid dialkyl esters deprive cultured rat oligodendroglial cells of glutathione and upregulate the expression of heme oxygenase 1
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20347008

Increased Cannabinoid Receptor 1-Immunoreactive Nerve Fibers in Overactive and Painful Bladder Disorders and Their Correlation With Symptoms
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20346490

Characteristic linear lesions and longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions in Chinese patients with neuromyelitis optica
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20346462

Genetic and environmental factors and the distribution of multiple sclerosis in Europe
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20345929

Structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging correlates of motor network dysfunction in primary progressive multiple sclerosis
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20345920

Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 activates integrin-mediated intracellular signaling and migration in oligodendrocytes
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20%20345750

Measuring fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis: reproducibility, responsiveness and concurrent validity of three Dutch self-report questionnaires
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20345240

Anoxia leads to a rapid translocation of human trypsinogen 4 to the plasma membrane of cultured astrocytes
http://www.ncb%20i.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20345763

Labels:


 

Stem cell transplant recipient and comedian releases book about operation


( Posted by- Desinie Smith )


Labels:


 

Comparison of serum apolipoprotein A-I between Chinese multiple sclerosis and other related autoimmune disease

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )
Serum apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was considered to be an immune regulator and could suppress pro-inflammatory cytokines generated by activated T cell in some autoimmune diseases.

Labels:


 

Insurers' fine print leaves some out to dry

State considering ban on policies' discretionary clauses.
(Posted By: Josi Creek)

In a matter of months, David Rankin went from swinging golf clubs to trying to navigate though life with a walker.

Since being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2006, Rankin and his wife, Deborah, had to move into a cheaper and more traversable single-story house with wide doorways in South Austin.

The federal government agreed with doctors' diagnosis, and Rankin soon became eligible for Social Security disability income. Rankin, a former accountant with Temple-Inland, figured he would not have trouble cashing in on his long-term disability insurance policy, considering his doctor and the feds agreed about his condition.

But Liberty Mutual denied his claim. A provision buried in his policy, called a discretionary clause, allowed the company to easily reject him.

To read the full story, click here.

Labels:


 

"Just Married On March 20!! There were so many times I had given up on love completely because of having MS"



(Posted By: Josi Creek)

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR ANGEL CINDI & HER HUSBAND JR.

(A letter to Stan from Cindi)

Just Married!!

Hey Stan & Angels...

On March 20 I married the love of my life and couldnt be happier!!


There were so many times I had given up on love completely because of having MS..

I thought "Who would want to spend their life with someone like me?" and I also thought It wouldnt be fair of me to burden someone with a life of Dr. Appts, IV's, Chemo, medical bills, you know..the perks that come along with us MS'rs.

Then, love happened..and the rest is obvious in the pictures.

You have exclusive rights Stan. Post whatever you want so that others can see as long as they have hope, there is a chance for happiness out there for them.

Jr. loves me unconditionally and totally understands that some days are going to suck. But he also knows we will make the most of the good days. As long as were together, we can tackle anything.

Thanks Stan for all that you do!!
Cindi

To see more wedding photos, and read more stories like this please visit: www.facebook.com/StansAngels

 

Acorda deals MS med direct to patients

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

Acorda Therapeutics is taking a novel approach to selling Ampyra, a treatment for multiple sclerosis. Designed to help MS patients walk, the drug won't be distributed through drugstores or even through doctors' offices. Patients will order it directly from the company.

To read the full story, click here.

Labels:


 

Advocates seek Congressional support for more research into autoimmune diseases


(Posted By: Josi Creek)

Those advocating for autoimmune disease research say improved prevalence and incidence data gathering and reporting as well as better collaboration are urgently needed to help prevent new autoimmune disease cases and treat existing ones.

Can you name an autoimmune disease? Apparently, only 13 percent of Americans can. That needs to change, according to the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association because autoimmune diseases are on the rise in the United States and worldwide.

To read the entire story, click here.

 

What's New on Multiple Sclerosis in PubMed

( Posted by -Desinie Smith )
In vivo Quantitative evaluation of brain tissue damage in Multiple Sclerosis using Gradient Echo Plural Contrast Imaging technique
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20338247


Developmental vitamin D deficiency causes abnormal brain development
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19500914

Labels:


Monday

 

Ocrelizumab: One Size Does Not Fit All


(Posted By: Josi Creek)

Risk of serious infections has hampered mAb’s development in RA and LE, but drug is still being tested in MS.


On March 8, Roche and Biogen Idec said that they were suspending treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with Ocrelizumab. It reportedly caused serious and opportunistic infections, several of which were fatal in some of the 2,400 patients treated in trials in more than 30 countries. Neither Roche nor Biogen Idec revealed how many patients died from infections related to the antibody.

To read the full story, click here.

 

New hope in M.S. treatment-Estriol

( Posted by- Desinie Smith ) .

Labels:


 

St. Joe's MS study will still go ahead-CCSVI

( Posted by- Desinie Smith)

St. Joseph's Healthcare will go ahead with its testing of a radical new theory on multiple sclerosis, despite Stanford University decision to halt the controversial treatment because of safety concerns.
Researchers Dr. Ian Rodger and Dr. Mark Haacke say their study could make the treatment safer, because it focuses on diagnosing chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) - a theory by Italian surgeon Dr. Paolo Zamboni that MS is a vascular disease and not an autoimmune disorder. .

Labels:


Sunday

 

"Theres a test for PML being developed by Biogen-Dr. Singer told me in 1-3 months this simple blood test should be avaliable"

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

The following was sent in a message to Stan:

Stan, There is an antibody test for PML Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy being developed by Biogen.

It is being sent to specific MS specialist Dr.'s like Dr. Barry Singer to be tested. He told me in 1-3 months this simple blood test should be available nation wide for testing.

It can detect antibodies the human body builds up against the JC virus (polyomavirus) which causes PML.

To continue reading the story, click here.

Also, visit http://www.facebook.com/StansAngels

Labels: ,


 

Early action for multiple sclerosis urged

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )
Though the incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) – a nerve disease whose cause and cure is yet unknown – is showing a steady rise in the city, availability of diagnostic centres with MRI facilities is proving to be a boon for such patients. Doctors are confident that patients with multiple sclerosis can live longer and healthier if they undergo early diagnosis and treatment, instead of waiting until the disease has reached an advanced stage.

Labels:


 

Drug Companies & Doctors: A Story of Corruption

( Posted by: Desinie Smith- " I'm just passing this information on. You can read the articles and be your own judge.
My opinion: I can tell you from personal experience that injectable drugs for MS are costing insurance companies $2,500 approx. per month per patient. These medications have no generics available which allows the pharmaceutical companies to keep their cost high. If the patents on said medications were left to run out, generics could be made and the medication's cost would be able to be brought down considerably. Please take note to the foot notes at the closing of these articles where the authors of the articles sight their numerous sources that they used to compile their facts in which to write the articles. I feel that with the billions ( yes, billions) of dollars that are being made from these medications ( and other medications for other diseases also ) the NMSS and other charities that raise money for research of different diseases ( not just MS)
are more likely to give research money to fund the findings of a drug's efficacy than they are to finding a cure. Also, be sure to read the recent articles about the newest studies being done by Biogen/Idec and Elan on Tysabri versus Copaxone and Rebif. Tysabri has already been proven in previous studies to lower relapse rates in Relapsing-Remitting MS by 67% and the other injectable drugs are said to be about half as effective as Tysabri.")

Recently Senator Charles Grassley, ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, has been looking into financial ties between the pharmaceutical industry and the academic physicians who largely determine the market value of prescription drugs. He hasn't had to look very hard.
Take the case of Dr. Joseph L. Biederman, professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and chief of pediatric psychopharmacology at Harvard's Massachusetts General Hospital. Thanks largely to him, children as young as two years old are now being diagnosed with bipolar disorder and treated with a cocktail of powerful drugs, many of which were not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for that purpose and none of which were approved for children below ten years of age.
To read the rest of the article click here. And here's a similar article which speaks of the same subject.

Labels: , ,


 

TWO KINDS OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, TWO DIFFERENT RESPONSES TO BETA-INTERFERON, STANFORD STUDY SHOWS


(Posted By: Josi Creek)




THIS STUDY WAS PUBLISHED THIS MORNING BY THE STANFORD SCHOOL OF MEDICINE


TWO KINDS OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, TWO DIFFERENT RESPONSES TO BETA-INTERFERON, STANFORD STUDY SHOWS

STANFORD, Calif. — There may be two distinct versions of multiple sclerosis, a study in both animal models and human blood samples suggests.

What’s more, a patient’s responsiveness to the most popular first-line drug for this episodic and all-too-often recurring autoimmune condition seems to depend on which version that patient has.

If these findings are confirmed in larger human studies and by other laboratories, people with multiple sclerosis might someday be able to take a simple blood test to see whether they are likely to respond to treatment with the standard multiple-sclerosis therapy, said senior study author Lawrence Steinman, MD, the George A. Zimmerman Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Public health may benefit, too, Steinman said, as the cost savings from being able to predict in advance which patients will benefit from beta-interferon, a costly bioengineered drug whose global sales come to some $4 billion a year, could be considerable.

Beta-interferon’s overall efficacy is only fair, he said, with perhaps half of all multiple-sclerosis patients experiencing an average one-third reduction in recurrences.

Plus, its discomfiting side effects — flulike symptoms — can make compliance an issue for patients, especially given the drug’s iffy efficacy.


In a study to be published online March 28 in Nature Medicine, Steinman and his colleagues used an established animal model of multiple sclerosis called experimental autoimmune encephalitis, or EAE, which they induced by injecting the animals with myelin in a way that caused the immune system to inappropriately attack the animals’ own myelin nerve-cell coatings.

Many nerve cells in mammalian brains and peripheral tissues must convey electrochemical impulses over great distances, and quickly. Long, wirelike projections that transmit these cells’ signals to other nerve or muscle cells are coated by myelin, a natural substance whose insulating properties sustain the impulses’ strength and increase their speed.

A few years ago while still a PhD student at the University of Alabama, the study’s first author, Robert Axtell, had shown that, as in people with multiple sclerosis, beta-interferon can reverse paralysis in mice with EAE. But it turns out that EAE can be induced by two different autoimmune pathways, characterized by different patterns of secretion by T cells.

Like nerve cells, immune cells also communicate with one another across long distances, but they accomplish this through various chemicals called cytokines that they secrete into the blood. Immune cells on the receiving end of a cytokine “signal” may respond quite differently, depending on the particular type of cytokine to which they are exposed. Two cytokines called gamma-interferon and IL-17, for example, tend to induce the kinds of inflammatory immune-system arousal that can trigger multiple sclerosis.

Axtell (now a postdoctoral scholar in Steinman’s lab), Steinman and their colleagues were able to induce two superficially similar forms of EAE in mice by directing the myelin-attacking T cells to predominantly secrete either gamma-interferon or IL-17, respectively. The researchers found that beta-interferon improved the condition of animals whose EAE had been induced by gamma-interferon-secreting T cells, but exacerbated symptoms in those whose EAE had been induced by IL-17-secreting T cells.

Intrigued, the investigators turned to humans. Another postdoctoral scholar in the Steinman lab, Brigit deJong, MD, the study’s second author, had previously been involved in research in Amsterdam in which multiple-sclerosis patients were treated with beta-interferon and meticulously followed up. The Stanford group obtained blood samples taken from 26 of these patients both before and about two years after the initiation of treatment. Without knowing which samples came from patients who had responded well or poorly to beta-interferon treatment, they went about measuring IL-17 levels in those samples.

Eventually, patients’ follow-up histories were revealed to the researchers and their measured IL-17 levels were paired with their post-treatment progress. A clear pattern emerged. Measurements of a particular variety of IL-17, called IL-17F, clustered at either very high or very low levels in individual patients’ blood. Those with very low detectable blood levels of IL-17F responded well to beta-interferon treatment, experiencing no relapses or instances of required steroids (to quickly shut down a malfunctioning immune system).

But patients with very high IL-17F levels — about one out of three subjects — responded poorly by the same criteria.

In fact, said Steinman, there is some evidence that beta-interferon actually worsened these patients’ conditions.


Steinman cautioned that the results need to be confirmed in larger patient groups, in his lab as well as in others. But, he said, “I think this has the potential to transform the way we take care of people with multiple sclerosis.”

He said a simple, already available blood test could spare many patients the inconvenience and side effects — and spare the health-care system the expense — of a drug that most likely won’t do any good. “The other side of the coin is that beta-interferon, if it’s given only to those who are predisposed to respond to it, could turn out to be a far better drug than we ever imagined.”

Although Steinman and his colleagues do not stand to benefit in any direct way from this work, Stanford University’s Office of Technology Licensing has filed a patent application on the use of the blood test.

Earlier work by Steinman, proceeding from animal models to clinical trials, led to the development of another blockbuster multiple-sclerosis drug, natalizumab, marketed under the trade name Tysabri.

Several other scientists from Stanford and elsewhere co-authored the Nature Medicine study, which was funded by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Axtell’s former PhD advisor, Chander Raman, PhD, of the University of Alabama-Birmingham’s Department of Medicine, shares senior authorship with Steinman. More information about Stanford’s Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, which supported the work, is available at http://neurology.stanford.edu/.

Labels:


 

Multiple treatment options available for MS

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

We're talking again about multiple sclerosis and reviewing today some of the physical therapy exercises that can be used to help patients with MS to better cope with this disability, while relating some of the newer drugs that are also being used to help overcome some of the other symptoms of MS. We'll also try to review what the current prognosis is for MS patients, as well.

Physical therapy and exercise can help preserve remaining function, and patients may find that various aids -- such as foot braces, canes and walkers -- can help them to remain independent and mobile. Avoiding excessive activity and avoiding heat are probably the most important measures that patients can take to counter physiological fatigue. If psychological symptoms of fatigue, such as depression or apathy, are evident, antidepressant medications may help.

To continue reading the story, click here.

Saturday

 

St. Joe’s selecting 100 locals for MS study

(Posted by- Desinie Smith )

Lottery for places in vascular research project

St. Joseph’s is holding the equivalent of a big-jackpot lottery for area multiple sclerosis patients when it randomly selects 100 of them to take part in its study of a radical new theory that the disease is vascular.

Labels:


 

Should you store your baby's cord blood?

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )

Saving your baby's own cord blood is expensive and the jury is out as to whether it's worth it.

Labels:


 

Coping with MS: Breaking the Cycle of Defeat

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )
March is Multiple Sclerosis education & awareness month, let's educate and grow awareness for this cause by delivering the ways to cope gracefully.
Shock and awe. That about describes the feeling when multiple sclerosis entered my life.

Labels:


 

MS Hormone-Estriol

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that affects the central nervous system. It’s believed to occur when, for an unknown cause, the body mistakenly attacks the myelin (the protective layer of insulation surrounding the nerves connecting the spinal cord and brain). The nervous system is like a complex pattern of wires, carrying electrical signals between the brain and the body.

Labels:


Friday

 

What's New in MS on PubMed

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )

Central sleep apnea in multiple sclerosis
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20336272

A comparison of MRI criteria for diagnosing pediatric ADEM and MS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20335562

PheWAS: Demonstrating the feasibility of a phenome-wide scan to discover gene-disease associations
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20335276

Structural integrity of callosal midbody influences intermanual transfer in a motor reaction-time task
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20336657

"Dirty electricity": what, where, and should we care?
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20336048

Labels:


 

Life of Chili resident Jennifer Mason on MS Web site

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

CHILI — Jennifer Mason's quick lesson on the debilitating power of multiple sclerosis began one morning in 2008."Woke up and had no feeling in my right leg," she said. "I thought it had just fallen asleep."
Mason is one of 10 people across the country with multiple sclerosis featured in an online project documenting the stories and everyday lives of people with the disease. Wekeepmoving.org is a joint effort between the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. It is designed to give people with the disease a voice to share with the public.

"We want to show them they are not alone. We want to show the general public what we are going through and what MS is," said Jason DeSilva, a New York City filmmaker and host of the project. "We have a really cool story to tell."

To read the full story, click here.

 

Monitoring Your Parents’ Falls

(" Since people with MS can be prone to falling this article definitely seems worthy of passing on. Of course, measures should be taken to prevent falls first and foremost." Posted by: Desinie Smith )

Anyone of a certain age remembers the old commercials with an elderly woman shouting “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!”

But what was the subject of many a joke among college-age young adults is no laughing matter. If you care for aging parents you know, or will soon find out, that falling and its subsequent physical complications can literally become a matter of life and death.

 

Pfizer Told to Pay $142.1 Million for Neurontin Marketing Fraud

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )

March 26 (Bloomberg) -- Pfizer Inc. violated U.S. racketeering law in the marketing of its epilepsy drug Neurontin and should pay $142.1 million in damages, a jury decided.
Kaiser Foundation Health Plan Inc. and Kaiser Foundation Hospitals claimed in a monthlong trial in federal court in Boston that Pfizer illegally promoted Neurontin for unapproved uses. The insurer said it was misled into believing migraines and bipolar disorder were among the conditions that could be treated effectively with Neurontin, approved in 1993 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for epilepsy.

Labels:


 

Popular pill Neurontin has side effects

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )


A UBC drug-research group has issued a “therapeutics letter” concluding that a widely used pain reliever has very little effect. The Therapeutics Initiative, which is funded by the B.C. Ministry of Health through a grant to UBC, states in its public letter that gabapentin has a “minor role in pain control”. The letter also claims that misleading promotion pushed this drug to “blockbuster status”.
And here's another article on Neurontin on the Boston Herald and the off label prescribing of Neurontin.

Labels:


Thursday

 

Biogen Idec And Elan Enroll First Patient In Large, Well-Controlled Head-to-Head Study Of Multiple Sclerosis Treatments

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )

Biogen Idec (NASDAQ: BIIB) andElan Corporation, plc (NYSE: ELN) today announced enrollment of the first patient in a global Phase IIIb, randomized, rater-blinded, active-controlled study designed to evaluate switching to TYSABRI® (natalizumab) from Copaxone® (glatiramer acetate) or Rebif® (interferon beta-1a) in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The study, called SURPASS, is expected to enroll 1,800 patients in 27 countries and provide direct comparative data of different treatment options for RRMS patients who experience breakthrough disease activity.

Labels: , , ,


 

Reporting on Trials Better, but Still Not Good

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )

Guidance that outlined the best ways to report randomized trial findings resulted in improvements, but the overall quality of reporting remained inadequate, researchers found.
From 2000 to 2006, there was an increase in the number of trials for which researchers reported details of the primary outcome (risk ratio 1.18, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.33), sample size calculation (RR 1.66, 95% CI 1.40 to 1.95), and the methods of random sequence generation (RR 1.62, 95% CI 1.32 to 1.97) and allocation concealment (RR 1.40, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.76).
"However," Sally Hopewell, DPhil, of the University of Oxford in England, and colleagues reported online in BMJ, "the quality of reporting remains well below an acceptable level."

Labels:


 

Dancing helps woman cope with Multiple Sclerosis


( Posted by- Desinie Smith )


Denial followed by depression.Those were her reactions when Jessica Dwyer of Willoughby was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis."That's really quite common," said neurologist Dr. Mary Rensel, an MS specialist with Cleveland Clinic's Mellen Center for Multiple Sclerosis Treatment and Research. "It often comes at an active time in people's lives, and it's something that doesn't go away."

Labels:


 

THIS IS ONE OF THE 22 EMAILS POSTED IN THE LAST WEEK ON OUR FACEBOOK SITE:



AND THEN GO TO THIS HEADLINE:

"the men that run Biogen & talked our neuos into giving us Tysabri are monsters for not letting us take the new test for PML"

TO READ THE COMMENTS ON THIS EMAIL FROM ANNA:





Stan, I read the email that you posted last week from Karin titled: "Couldnt I sue Tysabri if its proven they could have started giving the PML test NOW & didnt give it to me & then I get PML?"

I went to my neurologist yesterday and he told me that he was mad at Biogen too. I showed him your website Stan and the email from Karin. He said that lots of his patients feel the same way!

He told me that he was mad at Biogen too for not releasing the test for PML to all of his patients that are already on Tysabri. He has a very small practice but told me that most of the other Neurologists he knows are just as mad at Biogen as he is!

I guess the reason I'm writing this email is that I want to vent! I am very upset that Biogen got us on Tysabri! But I feel that the men that run Biogen and talked our neuos into giving us Tysabri are monsters for not letting us take the test for PML!

xoxoxo
ANNA

Labels:


 

Mother, son wage war against pediatric MS

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

Azle High School freshman Bryce Penley has Multiple Sclerosis. He was diagnosed in the eighth grade, at the age of 13, after complaining of double vision.

That was his first attack. Over the past 19 months he’s had eight more.
They manifest themselves in lots of different ways. Sometimes his hands tingle. Sometimes he gets dizzy. Sometimes his legs get numb and go weak.

To read the entire story, click here.

Labels:


 

N.J. lawmakers urge Gov. Christie to pardon ill Somerset man convicted of growing marijuana


(Posted By: Josi Creek)

This is a follow up to a story posted earlier this month.

Two state lawmakers called on Gov. Chris Christie today to pardon a Somerset County man sentenced to five years in prison for growing marijuana to treat his multiple sclerosis and commute his sentence to probation.
Senators Raymond Lesniak (D-Union) and Nicholas Scutari (D-Union) described the prison term facing John Ray Wilson as "cruel, unusual and unnecessary" in a letter written to the governor today. Wilson, 37, of Franklin Township, was sentenced to five years in prison last week after he was found guilty of second-degree manufacturing and third-degree drug possession by a jury in December.
To read the entire story, click here.

Labels:


 

MS Program Halted Amid Controversy


( Posted by Desinie Smith )

After Patients Push for Experimental Treatment, Doctors Conclude It's Too Risky
Stanford University vascular specialist Michael D. Dake has done pioneering work at the hospital's cardiac-catheterization labs, like fixing certain aortic aneurysms once thought untreatable.
Stanford Office of Communication & Public Affairs
Michael Dake is at the center of an uproar over a novel MS treatment.
But Dr. Dake's experimenting touched off a furor at the university recently when—based on preliminary research by an Italian surgeon—he inserted metal stents into the internal jugular veins of multiple sclerosis patients.

Labels:


 

On “Suffering” and Multiple Sclerosis


( Posted by- Desinie Smith)


Tips to Help Endure the Rough Times
By Julie Stachowiak, Ph.D., About.com Guide

Most of us living with multiple sclerosis (MS) feel pretty bad at least some of the time. Many of us would actually say that we spend large portions of our days feeling downright horrible. For some of us, our “good days” would still inspire non-MSers to call in sick to work and lay in bed.
Yet, we bristle when we hear someone referred to as an “MS sufferer” in the media. When acquaintances ask us how we are doing, we say, “oh, fine,” unless we are having some new acute flare-up of a symptom that bears mentioning (usually because it is noticeable).

Labels:


Wednesday

 

Medical Marijuana: Efficacy, Safety, and Potential for Misuse


( Posted by- Desinie Smith )
Question
How does the long-term side effect/adverse event profile and potential for misuse of marijuana compare with those of more common pain medications (ie, opioids)?

Labels:


 

Online Social Networks Bridge Gaps for Chronically Ill



(Posted By: Josi Creek)

I found this story today in the New York Times, and being that I have Multiple Sclerosis, I can totally relate. I rely on a MS chat site and Facebook for my online support, and the people that I have met online have become like family to me. It gives me a chance to reach out, and talk to people every day, where being mostly home bound, without the internet, I would be very lonely indeed.

Original Story By: Claire Cain Miller, The New York Times

A former model who is now chronically ill and struggles just to shower says the people she has met online have become her family. A quadriplegic man uses the Web to share tips on which places have the best wheelchair access, and a woman with multiple sclerosis says her regular Friday night online chats are her lifeline.

For many people, social networks are a place for idle chatter about what they made for dinner or sharing cute pictures of their pets. But for people living with chronic diseases or disabilities, they play a more vital role.

To read the entire story, click here.

 

Improved Detection of Active Multiple Sclerosis Lesions: 3D Subtraction Imaging1

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )
Abstract
Purpose: To examine the benefits of using near-isotropic single-slab three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the creation of subtraction images and to evaluate their performance in the detection of active multiple sclerosis (MS) brain lesions in comparison with two-dimensional (2D) subtraction images.

Labels:


 

What's New in MS on PubMed

( Posted by- Desinie Smith)


Awareness of executive functioning deficits in multiple sclerosis: Self versus informant ratings of impairment
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20306356

Abnormal tau phosphorylation in primary progressive multiple sclerosis
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20306268

Palliative care for people severely affected by multiple sclerosis: evaluation of a novel palliative care service
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20305%20044

Mechanisms Underlying Inflammation in Neurodegeneration
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20303880

Project Shake-It-Up: Using health promotion, capacity building and a disability studies framework to increase self efficacy
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20302442

Labels:


 

Cladribine Tablets: A Potential New Short-course Annual Treatment for Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )

From Medscape

Abstract
Cladribine, a synthetic deoxyadenosine analog, is an oral immunomodulatory agent that produces targeted, sustained reduction of T and B lymphocytes. This mechanism of action provides the rationale for use in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) in a short-course annual dosing regimen. Based on the results of a pivotal Phase III study, therapy with cladribine tablets has the potential to become a licensed oral disease-modifying medication for relapsing forms of MS.

Labels:


Tuesday

 

Drug Production Gets Aquatic

Tuesday, March 23, 2010
Original Story By: Lauren Gravitz

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

Green algae are cheap to grow, hard to kill, and quick to thrive.
Such traits make the tiny plants an ideal production factory, one that is already being extensively explored as a source for biofuels. But a few people are also looking to algae to do a completely different brand of work: the manufacturing of therapeutic drugs, a system that could one day produce large quantities of certain drugs at one-thousandth of today's costs.

A huge number of so-called biologic drugs, made up of proteins rather than small molecules, are produced, en masse, by bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cell culture--the cells produce proteins that are processed and turned into therapies for cancer, multiple sclerosis, and diabetes, among many other diseases. But such methods can be expensive to set up and maintain: Feeding them requires large amounts of nutrients, sustaining them requires large amounts of energy, and creating sterile facilities is a costly proposition. Stephen Mayfield, director of the San Diego Center for Algae Biotechnology at the University of California at San Diego, believes that algae, which subsist on sunlight and carbon dioxide in the air, could be an ideal and cost-effective substitute.
To view the whole story, click here.

 

Sunlight may play a big role in controlling MS

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )

Ultraviolet portion of sunlight plays a bigger role than vitamin D
in controlling multiple sclerosis (MS), according to researchers at University of Wisconsin-Madison. For more than 30 years, scientists have known that multiple sclerosis (MS) is much more common in higher latitudes than in the tropics.

Labels:


 

‘Cure’ for Multiple Sclerosis Verified in Latest Research, Trials Coming Soon



( Posted by- Desinie Smith )

A few months ago we mentioned how Paolo Zamboni developed an amazing possible “cure” for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) that’s based on a radical new theory of what causes the condition. There has been rampant speculation inside and outside the medical community as to whether Zamboni’s theory and treatments are sound.



Labels:


 

Frick to Receive National MS Society's Highest Honor

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

Joseph A. Frick, the President and CEO of Independence Blue Cross, has been named the 2010 Hope Award recipient for philanthropic service and community leadership by the Greater Delaware Valley Chapter of the National MS Society.

Mr. Frick will receive the Hope Award at the MS Dinner of Champions at the Crystal Tea Room in Philadelphia on October 22, 2010. Co-Chairs of the event, expected to draw more than 600 guests, are David L. Cohen, Larry Kane, Ira Lubert, the Hon. Nicholas Maiale and Judith Spires.

Read the whole story, click here.

 

Woman Begins Run Across Country To Battle Multiple Sclerosis

(Posted By: Josi Creek)A young woman Monday began the run of her life In San Francisco—one that will take her all the way across the country—to help fund a cure for multiple sclerosis.Ashley Kumlien, a 25-year-old Milwaukee native, brought a donated motor home and a group of joggers to San Francisco to begin the “M.S. Run In The U.S.” journey."I'm running across America for MS because my mom has had multiple sclerosis for more than 27 years,” said Ashley. “She's inspired me my whole life so I finally figured out a way to use my love of running to inspire others to donate and help find a cure for MS."

To view the whole story, click here.

Labels: ,


Monday

 

Testing New MS Theory as Patients Demand Care Now

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )


WASHINGTON (AP) -- Under intense pressure from patients, some U.S. doctors are cautiously testing a provocative theory that abnormal blood drainage from the brain may play a role in multiple sclerosis -- and that a surgical vein fix might help.
If it pans out
, the approach suggested by a researcher in Italy could mark a vast change for MS, a disabling neurological disease long blamed on an immune system gone awry.

Labels:


 

Biogen Accepts a Third Icahn Supporter to Board


(Posted By: Josi Creek)

BOSTON (Reuters) — Biogen Idec, the biotechnology company, said on Monday that it had come to an agreement with the investor Carl C. Icahn under which Mr. Icahn would abandon his threatened proxy fight in return for Biogen’s acceptance of a nominee to its board.

The agreement brings the number of Icahn representatives on Biogen’s board to three and heads off what would have been Mr. Icahn’s third proxy contest in three years at the company.

Biogen, which makes the multiple sclerosis drugs Tysabri and Avonex, is one of the world’s biggest biotechnology companies, with revenue of $4.4 billion in 2009. Tysabri, its most important product, is made in a 50-50 partnership with the Irish drug maker Elan.



To view the entire story, click here.

Labels: ,


 

Online Neurology Service Cuts Waiting Times

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

Neurologists at St Vincent’s Hospital in Dublin have cut waiting times for their outpatients department from an average of 18 months to 14 weeks by automating the GP referral process and changing their work practice to a more outpatient-based service.

Consultant neurologist Dr Niall Tubridy came up with the idea for Neurolink, a web-based GP referral service, when travelling through New York’s JFK Airport. ‘‘I thought that if they could manage so much of the running of a major airport electronically, where so much was done online, we should be able to adapt that to a hospital setting," Tubridy said.

Tubridy and Professor Michael Hutchinson launched Neurolink in 2006. With Neurolink, GPs use specially-designed templates that ensure neurologists receive detailed referral letters. Based on that information, neurologists can advise GPs whether a hospital outpatient appointment is necessary. If an appointment is required, the neurologist arranges this and the neurology department contacts the patient directly. Neurolink also offers GPs a platform to ask neurologists about patients who present with headaches and other, more specialised conditions.


Read the full story here.

 

Swift turns the tables on MS


(Posted By: Josi Creek)

(Left) Plano resident Rebekah Swift poses with her two dogs. Swift was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis when she was a teen and now works to help others with the disease.

“Imagine you have a telephone cord,” Rebekah Swift said. “What happens if you take the cord and scrape off the plastic coating? It exposes the wires. So what if you start messing with the wires? It will make the phone call sound unclear. That is how my nerves send messages to my brain. That’s MS. And there’s no way to put the plastic coating back on the cord.”

Swift, a Plano resident, was 12 years old when she had her first experience with multiple sclerosis. She was carrying a glass of water to her mother when her body fell to the floor, unable to move. She was lying there, frozen, but her brain was telling her she was still walking. She knew something was wrong.

Read her full story here.

 

The Gordon Conference on Myelin


( Posted by- Desinie Smith )


Back in February, an atypical group of tourists–some 150 myelin biologists from around the world—converged on Ventura, CA (a destination usually reserved for world class surfers and horse and dirt track car racing aficionados.) They were there to attend the Gordon Conference on Myelin, the world’s most advanced conference on the study of myelin. Held every other year, this suped-up think-tank for myelin research not only attracts the top experts in the field, but also invited speakers from a variety of scientific disciplines, ranging from molecular biologists to clinicians focused on remyelination.

Labels:


 

Forbes & Prentice: Stem-Cell Health Care Must Put the Patients First


( Posted by- Desinie Smith )
As spiraling health care costs increase and public debate over health care collide in the headlines, it’s time to question the value that Americans have received for their tax dollar investment in some medical research. Specifically, how are health dollars being allocated regarding actual promising treatments for patients versus speculative, controversial research?
Last March, President Barack Obama opened more taxpayer funding for stem-cell research and authorized use of virtually any embryonic stem cells for research. As a result, the National Institutes of Health has approved 43 new embryonic stem-cell lines for taxpayer-funded experiments, but that is not necessarily good news for sick people.

Labels:


 

Early MS intervention urged

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )
Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who had undergone treatment with Betaferon since early diagnosis are living longer, healthier lives than those who waited until the disease progressed further, according to new data presented at a symposium in Melbourne on the weekend.
International MS expert Dr Thomas Leist, director of the Multiple Sclerosis Centre at Thomas Jefferson University in the US, presented a study on regular users of Betaferon (interferon beta-1b) which found that 84.7 per cent of patients on standard-dose treatment were still alive compared to 72.4 per cent of those on a placebo.

Labels:


Sunday

 

Former thrill-seeker with MS offers watercolors for exhibit, auction

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

Carol Huntsman of Olmsted Falls used to jump out of planes, walk off of cliffs and raft down wild rivers. That was all before she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1997. While those adventures used to define her as a person, Huntsman found another way to be herself: painting.

Huntsman is showing two of her watercolors at Local Girl Gallery, 16106 Detroit Ave. in Lakewood, this month as part of “It’s a Green World,” an auction and exhibit to raise funds and awareness for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. The auction was held Friday night, but the gallery will display works by artists with multiple sclerosis and those helping to create a world free of the disease through the end of the month.

Read the full story here.

 

True Romance: They had MS in common, and much more

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

Joe Rosochacki and Judy Baer have quite the tale. Whereas most people would have seen only black clouds, they found the silver lining.

After Joe was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2006, he started searching for answers on MS-Epals, a forum for those with the chronic illness. He found Judy, who had been diagnosed about 10 years earlier. He e-mailed her, but this wasn't the first time a guy had tried to engage her.

"There were several requests from some lonely hearts who thought to use the system as a dating service," she says. "All of these requests were denied."


Read the full story here.

 

Ailing await medicinal marijuana


( Posted by- Desinie Smith )
Donna Doak anxiously awaits the day when she can get a prescription for marijuana.
The Swedesboro nurse, who suffers from multiple sclerosis and spinal stenosis and is wheelchair-bound, said marijuana can ease her pain without the nasty side effects of her current medications.
"Now that it's been legalized, I want to pursue it," said Doak, who was among the roughly dozen people who attended a town hall meeting at the Collingswood Library sponsored by the Coalition for Medical Marijuana New Jersey. "I just think it's going to really enable me to have a better quality of life."

Labels:


 

'My way of contributing' to Falmouth vets


( Posted by- Desinie Smith )
FALMOUTH — As the number of veterans who need assistance continues to rise, one local contractor is cutting through the red tape and taking matters into his own hands.
Brad Broderick, owner of Broderick Building and Remodeling in Falmouth, heard World War II veteran John Vose needed help to build a handicapped ramp for his wife, Charlotte.
Charlotte, who is confined to a wheelchair due to diabetes, multiple sclerosis and arthritis, hadn't been able to leave the house in 18 months, Broderick said, because the couple didn't have the $3,000 to pay for a ramp. So the 40-year-old built it for them. For free.

Labels:


 

Skiing adapts to the participant, not other way around

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )

Perfect fit
Skiing adapts to the participant, not other way around

Diane Morrell is perfectly at home in her sit-ski.
Diane Morrell knows first-hand how scary it can be to go down the hill — but she knows with each run, her skills will improve.
"It's a very free and empowering experience to be able to ski like everyone else,"said Morrell, 43, a member of the No Limits Ski Club at Searchmont Resort.
"And as far as our instructors, I have total confidence in their skill to teach."
The club, approaching the end of its second year of formal operation, provides ski instruction to both children and adults with disabilities. It is open on Sundays during the regular ski season and administered through annual fees charged to the participants.

Labels:


 

Efforts see barriers tumble down

( Posted by- Desinie Smith )
When he was first diagnosed with multiple sclerosis nearly half a century ago, John McClintock did not allow the news to drag him down.
"I decided I would try to get on with my life and keep on doing what I was doing," said McClintock.
And get on with it he has done, leaving behind a legacy of improvements for people with disabilities in this area and across the country.
McClintock, 81, is a founder of the non-profit group Education for Quality Accessibility (EQA). He and his wife, Elaine, were named Brockville's Seniors of the Year in 2003.
"I try not to dwell on my problems, because everybody's got a problem of their own," said John McClintock.

Labels:


Saturday

 

Amber Carey was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 2000, but family members say what ultimately killed Carey was not her disease

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

GRAND HAVEN, Mich. (WZZM)-- The family of a Grand Haven woman is talking about her death.

34 year old Amber Carey died in the care of her boyfriend, William Masselink Junior. Masselink is charged with involuntary manslaughter and second degree vulnerable adult abuse.

Amber Carey was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 2000, but family members say what ultimately killed Carey was not her disease. They say it was Masselink.

Read the full story and see a video here.

 

Disabled woman ejected from Mac's store

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

Company apologizes for clerk's actions


A University of Windsor student is filing a human rights complaint after she was asked to leave a Mac's store because of her service dog.

Julie Holmes has multiple sclerosis and relies on a wheelchair and a specially trained service dog to get around.

"I went to Mac's to get a drink and I was asked to leave because of my service dog," said Holmes, who relies on her dog Fancy to act as her arms when she can't reach service counters.

Read the full story here.

 

Hidden disabilities are still disabilities

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

Warsaw woman takes time to educate others about MS


WARSAW -- Cj Crawford doesn't let the dirty glares bother her anymore as she exits her vehicle from a handicapped parking space. Having lived with multiple sclerosis for most of her adult life, the Warsaw woman chooses to educate those as to why she has the parking placard.


Read the rest of her story here.

 

Stem Cells in Menstrual Blood


They Can Even Become Neurons

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

Since I have Multiple Sclerosis, I am always trying to be on top of new research. In the beginning, stem cells seemed out of reach for most people. Now, as technology is developing, researchers are finding out more about stem cells, and different places they can be obtained.
One of the major barriers preventing widespread use of stem cells in therapeutic clinics is the great difficulty of collecting a large number of stem cells from any single person. But this isn’t because our bodies don’t have many stem cells; they are, in fact, present in most tissues. Rather, there are few tissues that freely shed their cells on a regular basis and in great quantity.


Read the full story here.

Friday

 

What's new on MS on AJNR

( Posted by Desinie Smith )

Functional MR Imaging Correlates of Neuropsychological Impairment in Primary-Progressive Multiple Sclerosis
http://www.ajnr.org/cgi/content/abstract/ajnr.A2071v1?ct=ct

Labels:


 

What's New in MS on PubMed

( Posted by Desinie Smith)

Persistent reflection underlies ectopic activity in multiple sclerosis: a numerical study
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20238485


2010 Mar 18. Exploring the roles of CD8(+) T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of autoimmune demyelination
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20237782

2010 Mar 17. Benign multiple sclerosis in Crete
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20237192

2010 Mar 17. Cerebrospinal fluid chitinase 3-like 1 levels are associated with conversion to multiple sclerosis
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20237129


2010 Mar;86(1013):153-9.
Neuromyelitis optica: an overview
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2%200237009

2010 Mar 15.Neuroinflammation resulting from covert brain invasion by common viruses - A potential role in local and global neurodegeneration
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20236772

2010 Mar 15.
Natalizumab plus interferon beta-1a reduces lesion formation in relapsing multiple sclerosis
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20236661

2010 Mar 2.
Serum and CSF Prolactin levels in Male and Female Patients with Clinically Isolated Syndrome or Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2%200236233


2010 Mar;10(1):47-64.
The Development of Cannabinoid CBII Receptor Agonists for the Treatment of Central Neuropathies
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20236042


2010 Mar;10(1):3-15.
Multiple sclerosis - established and novel therapeutic approaches
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20236038

Labels:


 

Brain Fitness Software Improves Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

Cognitive dysfunction is a common, often scary, symptom of Multiple Sclerosis. Cognitive evaluation techniques and neurorehabilitation studies have been used to greatly improve the dysfunction. A new brain fitness software by CogniFit Inc May help improve cognitive function and skills of multiple sclerosis patients.

Read the full story here.


 

MS Patient Gets 5 Years in Prison for Growing Pot

(Posted By: Josi Creek)

Jersey medical marijuana law too late for John Ray Wilson

A New Jersey Superior Court judge gave a man who suffers from multiple sclerosis the lowest possible jail term for growing marijuana plants outside his home two years ago. But that penalty is still five years behind bars for 37-year-old John Ray Wilson. "We're pretty disappointed," Chris Goldstein of the Coalition for Medical Marijuana said of the sentence.

[Read the full story here]

 

HERE'S 1 OF THE 1000's OF STORIES ON 100's OF SUBJECTS THAT ARE ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE:

 

Brothers going boldly in search of a cure for MS


( Posted by Desinie Smith )

Multiple sclerosis patients Evan and Duncan Thornton are travelling to Poland to try new and still-controversial surgery

OTTAWA — As Evan Thornton sees it, the relatively new and still-controversial surgery he’s about to have in Poland has no real drawbacks, and it’s a chance to get rid of the symptoms he’s been dealing with for the past decade. Best of all? He doesn’t have to go through it alone. (Read the full article here on the Ottawa Citizen)

Labels:


 

What's New in MS on PubMed

( Posted by Desinie Smith)

New approaches in the management of spasticity in multiple sclerosis patients: role of cannabinoids
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20234785

Adult human mesenchymal cells proliferate and migrate in response to chemokines expressed in demyelination
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20234187


Association of macrophage migration inhibitory factor gene promoter polymorphisms with multiple sclerosis in Turkish patients.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233515

The family of the multiple sclerosis patient: A psychosocial perspective

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233116

Quality of life in multiple sclerosis: Effects of current treatment options

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233115


Psychotic features associated with multiple sclerosis

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233114

Personality characteristics and disorders in multiple sclerosis patients: Assessment and treatment

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233113


Assessment and rehabilitation of cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233112


The neuropsychiatry of multiple sclerosis: Focus on disorders of mood, affect and behaviour

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233111



Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis in Europe: A Review

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233110

Therapeutic approach by Aloe vera in experimental model of multiple sclerosis

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233107

Therapeutic Effect of EDTA in Experimental Model of Multiple Sclerosis

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233106


Prostaglandins in pathogenesis and treatment of multiple sclerosis

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233088

Labels:


 

An upbeat MS update

(Posted by Desinie Smith )


As part of its ongoing campaign to raise awareness about multiple sclerosis, the
National MS Society has enlisted a camera crew--three people with MS--to create weekly videos featuring folks from across the nation who also have the autoimmune disease. Log on to the We Keep Moving Web site and you can vote for one of three candidates to be the program's s next subject.

Read the rest of the article on the Washington Post click here.

 

Illness manages to give him perspective, singer says


( Posted by Desinie Smith)


Clay Walker doesn't waste time while enjoying life.
The country singer -- whose bar gigs helped score him a major-label deal, followed by 11 No.1 singles -- received a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis in 1996, just three years into his mainstream music career.
Yet he hasn't let the chronic disease, which affects the central nervous system, deflate his art or his enthusiasm for fans and family - crediting daily injections of amino acids for his strength.


Read the rest of the article here.

 

Positive Results Published on Clinical Trials of Oral FTY720 (Fingolimod) for Relapsing MS -- Novartis Applies to FDA and European Regulatory Agency f

( Posted by Desinie Smith)

Jan 20, 2010
Positive Results Published on Clinical Trials of Oral FTY720 (Fingolimod) for Relapsing MS -- Novartis Applies to FDA and European Regulatory Agency for Approval
Positive results from two large-scale phase III clinical trials of oral fingolimod (FTY720) have been published showing it significantly reduced multiple sclerosis relapse rates, and one of the trials also suggested it could slow the progression of disability. The sponsor, Novartis International AG, has announced that it applied for marketing approval in the U.S. and European Union in December 2009. There are currently no approved oral disease-modifying therapies for MS. The papers were published early online in the New England Journal of Medicine (links one and two) on January 20, 2010, along with a separate paper that describes results from a clinical trial of another orally administered experimental therapy, cladribine.

Read the rest of the article on the NMSS's website click here.

Labels:


Thursday

 

A researcher's unrelenting pursuit of an MS therapy


( Posted by Desinie Smith )

Every day, Dawn Freney looks at her six children with fresh gratitude, amazed to think each of them protected her while growing in her womb.
It's a logical thought. Last spring, the busy West Chester volleyball mom was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Her neurologists, who estimated she's had the crippling disorder for at least nine years, marveled at her vigor, considering she'd had no MS treatment.


Read the rest of the article here on Philly.com.

Labels:


 

Biogen: Now 42 Cases Of Brain Infection In Tysabri Patients

( Posted by Desinie Smith)

By Thomas Gryta Of DOW JONES NEWSWIRES
NEW YORK (Dow Jones)--Biogen Idec Inc. (BIIB) disclosed seven more cases of a rare brain infection in multiple sclerosis patients using Tysabri, which it sells with Elan Corp. (ELN), bringing the total number of cases to 42 as of last Wednesday.
Another patient with the infection has died, bringing the total deaths to nine in patients that have developed progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, or PML, according to the Cambridge, Mass., biotech company.
Read the rest of the article in the Wall Street Journal by clicking here.

Labels: , ,


Wednesday

 

CCSVI Treatments Halted at Stanford After Two “Adverse Events”


( Posted by Desinie Smith)


By Julie Stachowiak, Ph.D., About.com Guide to Multiple Sclerosis
Tuesday March 16, 2010
Let me start by mentioning that these procedures involved placing stents in the jugular veins, NOT the procedures that were performed using balloon angioplasty only.
Many of us living with multiple sclerosis (MS) have been following the stories around chronic cerebrospinal insufficiency (CCSVI), a new theory which purports that the root cause of MS may lie in veins that are narrowed, blocked or deformed not allowing blood to drain from the brain in a normal flow. Since this seems to be a mechanical problem, it would make sense that by fixing the veins to improve the flow would be a logical step.

To read the rest of the article click here.

Labels:


 

Video documents Hawkins man's life with multiple sclerosis

( Posted by Desinie Smith)

CHURCH HILL — Volunteer High School teacher and coach Jason Skelton was inspired by his father’s bravery and fortitude during a 16-year battle with multiple sclerosis.
In 2004, less than two weeks before his father succumbed to the disease, Skelton, 38, was diagnosed with MS as well. Videos will be coming later on the site.
To read the rest of the article click here.

Labels:


 

Living with multiple sclerosis, Ypsilanti man proves the power of positive thinking


( Posted by Desinie Smith)

Marc Lerner has multiple sclerosis. He uses a wheelchair, is legally blind, has balance problems, short-term memory loss, bladder hassles and difficulty walking.
But he is living with, not dying from, his illness.
"When I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, I began the most significant journey of my life," said Lerner, a 58-year old Ypsilanti resident. "My illness took me deeper than anything else I've ever done. Everything I knew, everything I thought, was thrown out the window, it seemed."

To read the rest of the article click here.

Labels:


 

Ampyra (the new walking pill) - Acorda Therapeutics Webcast

( Posted by Jennifer Landry)

Acorda Therapeutics, the company that developed and is now marketing AMPYRA (dalfampridine) in the U.S., is hosting a webcast for MS bloggers on Wednesday, March 17 and our own Jennifer Landry has been invited to attend. Acorda’s senior leadership team, including their CEO Ron Cohen (above), are providing an overview of AMPYRA, including the clinical trial data and information on pricing and insurance. Most importantly, they are also taking questions from the attendees.

MS News Channel will be posting updates following the webcast, so stay tuned.

Labels:


 

News on Medline on MS

( Posted by Desinie Smith )
M Davis, S Auh, M Riva, ND Richert, JA Frank, HF McFarland, and F Bagnato Ring and nodular multiple sclerosis lesions: A retrospective natural history study. Neurology 9 Mar 2010 74(10): p. 851.
http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/medline/pmid;20211910

D Gijbels, G Alders, E Van Hoof, C Charlier, M Roelants, T Broekmans, B Op 't Eijnde, and P Feys Predicting habitual walking performance in multiple sclerosis: relevance of capacity and self-report measures. Mult Scler 5 Mar 2010.
http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/medline/pmid;20207785

PG Bronson, S Caillier, PP Ramsay, JL McCauley, RL Zuvich, PL De Jager, JD Rioux, AJ Ivinson, A Compston, DA Hafler, SJ Sawcer, MA Pericak-Vance, JL Haines, The International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium (IMSGC), SL Hauser, JR Oksenberg, and LF Barcellos CIITA variation in the presence of HLA-DRB1*1501 increases risk for multiple sclerosis. Hum Mol Genet 8 Mar 2010.
http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/medline/pmid;20211854

J Qin, E Berdyshev, J Goya, V Natarajan, and G Dawson Neurons and oligodendrocytes recycle sphingosine-1-phosphate to ceramide; significance for apoptosis and multiple sclerosis. J Biol Chem 9 Mar 2010.
http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/medline/pmid;20215115

M Laron, H Cheng, B Zhang, JS Schiffman, RA Tang, and LJ Frishman Comparison of multifocal visual evoked potential, standard automated perimetry and optical coherence tomography in assessing visual pathway in multiple sclerosis patients. Mult Scler 5 Mar 2010.
http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/medline/pmid;20207786

J Bentzen, EM Flachs, E Stenager, H Bronnum-Hansen, and N Koch-Henriksen Prevalence of multiple sclerosis in Denmark 1950-2005. Mult Scler 9 Mar 2010.http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/medline/pmid;20215479

EC Tallantyre, L Bo, O Al-Rawashdeh, T Owens, CH Polman, JS Lowe, and N Evangelou Clinico-pathological evidence that axonal loss underlies disability in progressive multiple sclerosis. Mult Scler 9 Mar 2010.
http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/medline/pmid;20215480

N Gorgoraptis, CA Wheeler-Kingshott, TM Jenkins, DR Altmann, DH Miller, A Thompson, and O Ciccarelli Combining tractography and cortical measures to test system-specific hypotheses in multiple sclerosis. Mult Scler 9 Mar 2010.

http://highwire.stanford.edu/cgi/medline/pmid;20215478

Labels:



Go to Newer News Go to Older News