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Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
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Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

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Weill Medical College of Cornell University

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Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
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University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
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Sunday

 

Can Diet Ease MS Fatigue? Clinical Trial, Now Recruiting, Wants to Find Out




























The National Multiple Sclerosis Society  announced that it has dedicated more than $1 million to support a clinical study at the University of Iowa that will compare two types of diet and their effectiveness in easing fatigue in people with MS.
Read more »

 

Positive Results Released for Novartis’ BAF312 in Secondary Progressive MS Patients

























Image Source: NEWSLOCKER

By Editorial Team

Pharmaceutical giant Novartis released promising news ahead of the official release of their results from the largest controlled study surrounding individuals with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS).1  SPMS generally supersedes relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) in the progression of MS.  At this stage, individuals experience a degradation of neurological function, and previously, there have been few treatment options for this population.
Read more »

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Saturday

 

Help for Anyone Newly Diagnosed with MS



































Being diagnosed with MS can be more than a bit of a shock at first. Yes, you finally know what you’ve got, what all those symptoms you’ve having mean, and you have heard what your neurologist told you.
Read more »

 

Optical Coherence Tomography May Help Clinicians Predict MS Progression Years Ahead Of Time: VIDEO






















Optical coherence tomography (OCT), which is used to measure retinal thickness, can help clinicians predict multiple sclerosis (MS) progression two to five years later, according to an international longitudinal cohort study presented at the 2016 AAN Annual Meeting and published in Lancet Neurology. Overall, the researchers found that thinning in the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber of patients with either clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting MS, or progressive MS, as measured by OCT, was associated with a twofold risk of disability worsening at two to three years of follow-up. But independent experts stress that use of OCT in MS should be limited to clinical trials at this point, and more research is needed to assess its clinical utility. Neurology Today Editor-in-chief. Steven P. Ringel, MD, FAAN, and Associate Editor Dr. Robert G. Holloway Jr., MD, FAAN, discuss the study with Peter Calabresi, MD, FAAN, director of the neuroimmunology division at Johns Hopkins University.
Read more »

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Friday

 

It’s time to get real about Depression and Suicide in MS (and other Chronic Illnesses)



















Image Source: ALTERNATIVEHEALTHCARECENTER

By Devin Garlit

When it comes to multiple sclerosis and other chronic illnesses, we seem to be very fond of talking about some of our symptoms, our difficulty walking, speech problems, our pain, and even our fatigue. It’s time, however, that we get real about our mental health problems. Yes, there are mentions here and there about depression, but I still don’t feel this topic is given the full attention it needs. It’s my opinion that more than any other issue, depression and anxiety have the ability to shut us down even more than unresponsive or numb legs, more than speech troubles, and even more than having little to no energy. All of these things are, of course, related, but these mental issues can cause the most suffering.
Read more »

 

Patient-led Study, REAL MS, Invites Adults to Help Advance and Direct MS Research



























An innovation in MS research has been launched by the iConquerMS initiative — a longitudinal, prospective study called “REAL MS,” an acronym for “Research Engagement About Life with Multiple Sclerosis,” with a goal of accelerating research into personalized treatments for MS patients.
Read more »

Thursday

 

Turning 50 With MS: A Time to Look Forward and Back
























When I was 30 years old and living in Ithaca, NY, I had what felt like an epiphany. While walking past a renowned Buddhist monastery after a haircut one day, I was struck by the thought that I would not live to see 50.
Read more »

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Utica man with Multiple Sclerosis wants to document his journey: VIDEO






















Ron Oakes is working on a documentary to show the world what's it's like having MS.
Read more »

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Wednesday

 

Seven Incredible Resources I Found for the MS Community




























By Cathy Chester

A lot has happened to me after returning from the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Center’s (CMSC) annual meeting, so I was happy to find some free time to finally go through the pamphlets I collected while I was there.
Read more »

 

MS Hugs Me, Hugs Me Not




























In the two years following my diagnosis, I had many bouts of chest pain, breathing difficulties, and sharp stomach pains. I worried that some other terrible illness was right around the corner. Four EKGs, three ultrasounds, two pulmonary function tests, and one colonoscopy later I had a surprisingly good bill of health. Off to a counselor I went to deal with possible hypochondria likely brought on by the MS diagnosis.
Read more »

Tuesday

 

Stuff We Tell Ourselves About Having MS






















































Image Source: MEDCITYNEWS

By Kim Dolce

I have MS but MS doesn’t have me.
Read more »

 

The Importance of Early Treatment in MS: VIDEO























Nick Rjike
Image Source: HERALDSCOTLAND

In this MS Society video, listen to Nick Rijke, Executive Director of Policy and Research for the MS Society, talking about the importance of early treatment for multiple sclerosis patients.
Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by MULTIPLESCLEROSISNEWSTODAY
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length

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Monday

 

In mice, a possible means to counteract MS























When you have multiple sclerosis, your nerves start to leak information. The nerve cells that connect your limbs to your core, and your core to your spine and brain, begin to ferry signals less quickly and accurately. Then they eventually break down themselves. It’s due to a process called “demyelination,” and in mouse models scientists are starting to be able to undo this erosion of the nervous system’s insulating fiber.
Read more »

 

Sydney MS researchers link risk genes to Vitamin D





















Genetic risk factors of multiple sclerosis have been linked to Vitamin D activation. 
Image Source: THEAGE

The further away you live from the equator the more likely you are to be diagnosed with MS.
Read more »

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Sunday

 

Blood Test Seen to Distinguish MS from Other Neurological Conditions



Researchers at Michigan State University suggest that a blood test can distinguish patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) from people with other neurological conditions, according to a recent study published in EBioMedicine.
Read more »

 

Etiquette for Handicapped Stalls


















































We’ve all been there – waiting in line for the toilet when out of the designated handicapped stall strolls a person who is obviously able bodied and didn‘t need to use this special space. I know this topic is going to spark comments because we all have different experiences and views as to when it’s ok to use handicapped restroom stalls.

Stuart Schlossman, from MSViews and News, was in San Francisco recently and posted this picture on his Facebook page that illustrates my question about the etiquette of public restrooms.
Read more »

Saturday

 

Delays in Seeing Specialists a Growing Barrier in MS Diagnosis and Treatment




























There can be absolutely no excuse for anyone experiencing the first signs and symptoms of neurological conditions like MS having to wait a long time to see an appropriate specialist, such as a neurologist. Delays in seeing specialists is a complaint often heard from patients in various countries, and it has now been highlighted in the U.K.
Read more »

 

Understanding and Coping With MS Flares























Here's why multiple sclerosis symptoms flare, along with a few tips to prevent flares.

In MS, the immune system mistakenly attacks the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord), starting with the myelin sheath, the insulating layer of protein and fat that protects the part of the nerve cell known as the nerve fiber, or axon.
Read more »

Friday

 

Painsomnia: An Exhausting Problem



















One of the most commonly reported symptoms of multiple sclerosis is fatigue. So it’s no surprise that those suffering with MS may hear that they need to get some rest. Indeed, many suffering from MS will certainly try to get some rest and will end up failing miserably at that endeavor because of what I like to call “Painsomnia”. Painsomnia is the inability to sleep or rest because your body is in pain. It’s something that affects a large number of those with chronic illness, myself included, and it can make the normal fatigue we suffer from even more unbearable.
Read more »

 

Specific Definition of Fatigue in MS Proposed as Way to Advance Research into Symptom


























Researchers from Colorado State University propose a new model of fatigue in MS, designed to overcome the lack of a unified definition of fatigue that can be objectively tested using experimental approaches.
Read more »

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Thursday

 

CVS Caremark Drops 3 DMTs from Formulary


























By Laura Kolaczkowski

Here we go again…. The fight to get access to the MS disease modifying therapy (DMT) that works for us becomes a real struggle when our insurance company decides to ‘drop’ our DMT from their formulary. Insurance drug formularies are the list of drugs that are ones that will be covered. Anything not on the formulary is not routinely allowed to be used by the person who is insured by that company, although some doctors have been successful in fighting and getting these drugs covered in other ways. If you want to use a drug that is not on the formulary, you will be expected to pay 100% of the cost.
Read more »

 

New Pre-HSCT Treatment May Be the Future, but HSCT with Lower Dose Chemo is Right Choice for MS Patients Now
























News that scientists in the U.S. are working to find a new pre-HSCT treatment to carry out stem cell transplants without the need for chemotherapy, as published in Multiple Sclerosis News Today, leaves me with mixed feelings.
Read more »

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Wednesday

 

MS in Children: VIDEO



























Image Source: MYLLU

By Susha Cheriyedath, MSc

MS is occasionally diagnosed in children and teens, though it occurs more often in adults. According to the latest estimates, around 9000 children in the United States have MS, and some studies report that 2-5% of MS patients start experiencing symptoms before age 18.
Read more »

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MS Fatigue: Puzzling over the Jigsaw





































Feeling tired?  No surprise there.  Fatigue is as much a part of living with Multiple Sclerosis as sand is a part of the beach where I live.
Read more »

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Tuesday

 

REAL MS Research Needs You

























You want to help find answers about multiple sclerosis but don’t know how, and I hear your frustration about being unable to contribute in meaningful ways. Let me share with you the news that REAL MS (Research Engagement About Life with MS) was launched this summer, and I invite all of you who live with this chronic disease to join me in this important multiple sclerosis research study.
Read more »

 

Gaming Camera Could Aid MS Treatment















Gholami captured the movement of 10 MS patients and 10 members of an age-and-sex-matched control group using the Kinect device. The MS patients had previously been assessed for gait abnormalities using the traditional clinician method. NeuroscienceNews.com image is for illustrative purposes only.

A commonly used device found in living rooms around the world could be a cheap and effective means of evaluating the walking difficulties of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients.
Read more »

Monday

 

Treating Early Symptoms of MS May Extend Time to Diagnosis

























Industry-funded study also found therapy doubled time until a relapse occurred.


Starting MS treatment when the first signs of the disabling disease appear may delay the period before the condition is definitively diagnosed or a relapse occurs, new long-term research indicates.
Read more »

 

Early Disease Activity in MS Seen to Have Little Long-Term, Prognostic Value




























A large study of MS patients came to the conclusion that clinical and brain imaging assessments drawn from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are poor measures of long-term prognosis for patients.
Read more »

Sunday

 

Pilot Study Finds Fatigue, Mood in MS Patients Improved by Low-Fat, Plant-Based Diet


































Though approved therapies for MS exist, the disabling disease remains currently incurable leading to greater interest for promoting healthier lifestyles that could ease or slow disease impacts such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease which increase progression of disability, brain injury, and atrophy.
Read more »

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Treating MS at the Earliest Sign Offers Long-Term Benefit


























Image Source: MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS-CAUSES-SYMPTOMS-AND-TREATMENT

The first episode of MS often manifests as numbness, vision problems or problems with balance. Up to 85% of people in this situation, which is called clinically isolated syndrome, will in time be diagnosed with MS.
Read more »

Saturday

 

5 Things a Neurologist Wants You to Know About MS


















Scientists' understanding of MS is beginning to change as research on MS progression intensifies.

Whether you’re newly diagnosed with MS or have had it for decades, you probably have some questions about the disease, how it might affect you in the future, and how to stay as healthy as possible for as long as possible.
Read more »

 

Treating Multiple Sclerosis Early Can Bring Benefits, Delay Relapses: VIDEO




Getting an early head start on treating MS may bring dividends years down the road, finds a new study published Wednesday in Neurology.
Read more »

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Friday

 

Paying the MS Tax: The day after being active
















By Devin Garlit

It’s time for me to talk about a pretty common occurrence in my life, those times when I have to “pay the MS Tax”. That’s what I call it anyway. I’m referring to that period of time after I’ve tried to act normal, when I’ve put on my best smile (real or not), bit the bullet, and went out and actually did some sort of activity like most people do. That time when I feel like I’m paying for acting like everyone else. For me, the day after an activity is typically filled with fatigue, pain, and even confusion that necessitates me doing next to nothing. While my experiences certainly don’t reflect everyone with MS (or other chronic illnesses for that matter), I know there are many that do deal with this phenomenon.
Read more »

 

Improving Confidence of RRMS Patients May Enhance Quality of Life, Decrease Depression, Study Finds





























Increasing a person’s confidence that they can complete tasks and reach goals in specific situations may benefit patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS).
Read more »

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Thursday

 

Becoming a Mom with MS









































By Calie Wyatt

I’ve known since I was very young, that I truly wanted one thing in life - to be a momma. So, of course, after being diagnosed with MS at such a young age, my first fear and question was, “Will I still be able to have children one day??” Thankfully my neurologist reassured me that most people with MS can and do lead normal lives and that most women with MS have amazing pregnancies! That was like music to my ears, however, the fear and anxiety of not being able to conceive was always in the back of my mind.
Read more »

 

5 Tips for Overcoming MS

















































Image Source: PINTEREST

Part 1 of 7: Overview
The basics
Highlights
  1. MS symptoms can change over time, so it helps to be flexible and open to new approaches.
  2. A well-balanced diet is important to your overall health.
  3. If you or a loved one is having trouble talking about MS, consider professional counseling.
Read more »

Wednesday

 

HERE’S HOW MS SYMPTOMS ARE RELIEVED BY CANNABIS




















How Can Cannabis Help?

One of the worst symptoms of MS is the pain that it causes to the entire body; often so extreme it can become debilitating. A study found that cannabis used to treat “Multiple Sclerosis related pain” was much more effective than a placebo. Another study concurred, adding that cannabis-based medicine did not have any serious side effects to speak of. Being able to manage otherwise severe pain means sufferers can more easily travel, work, or just enjoy their leisure time.
Read more »

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Tysabri’s Success in Impairing the Immune System in RRMS May Be Source of Its Problems





























Although Tysabri (natalizumab) is a highly effective in treating patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), some may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). According to a new study, this occurs because Tysabri impairs immune surveillance in the central nervous system and reactivates the latent John Cunningham polyomavirus (JCV).
Read more »

Tuesday

 

Tripping and Falling: My New Normal With MS



























By Trevis Gleason

I’m more than a month on from my latest multiple sclerosis setback and trying to settle into yet another new normal. A recent meeting with my MS specialist confirmed that my disease has, indeed, progressed since my appointment last spring.
Read more »

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Best First-Line Treatment for Aggressive MS May Be Equally Aggressive Immunotherapies










































Patients with aggressive onset multiple sclerosis, characterized by a rapidly progressing disease course and accumulation of disability, may benefit from early aggressive therapies instead of the escalation approach commonly given MS patients, according to researchers at Weill-Cornell Medical College.
Read more »

Monday

 

I Want To Talk To Someone Who Has Been There; Who Can I Call?




























Image Source: THEASSOCIATIONFORFRONTOTEMPORALDEGENERATION

Living with MS can be stressful, scary, frustrating, and isolating. The process of being diagnosed with MS can shatter one’s world. But one thing you quickly discover is that there are many people who share similar experiences and concerns.
Read more »

 

Can stem cell therapy really treat MS?






















MS sufferer Eric Thompson was able to rise from his wheelchair and walk just days after treatment with haematopoietic stem cells, according to a recent Daily Mail article. Unable to receive this aggressive treatment through the NHS, Thompson and his family raised £40,000 to undergo the treatment in Mexico.
Read more »

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Sunday

 

The 3-Step MS Diagnosis Method


























Image Source: GUARDIANLV

A common complaint I hear is that either getting a diagnosis for MS has taken a really long time or it hasn’t happened yet for people who believe they have this disease, so I was really interested in learning more from Dr. Mark Keegan, Mayo Clinic, on his 3-Step Method to Diagnose Multiple Sclerosis. He gave this talk as part of the 2016 Annual Consortium for MS Centers (CMSC) meeting and was part of a larger conversation about the challenges of diagnosing and misdiagnosing MS. I have already written about the problem of misdiagnosing MS, which was presented here by Dr. Andrew Solomon, who I interviewed for my earlier article.
Read more »

 

Antioxidant Therapies Seen as Promising Approach in Treating MS and Like Diseases



























A review article published in the British Journal of Pharmacology assesses antioxidant approaches for treating neurodegenerative disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
Read more »

Saturday

 

“You’re Not Disabled, You Just Don’t Want to Work”




















Has anyone ever told you that? Or suggested that? Probably not even to your face but either way, it is so insulting isn’t it? The idea that we are only using MS as an excuse to not work because we are just lazy. Obviously there are people who have MS that can still work but there are also many people with MS who can’t because news flash, MS does not affect everyone the same! Just because you have a cousin who has a friend whose mom has MS and they can work does not mean we all can… To those of us living with MS or living with someone who has it, this is obvious, something that does not even require thought so when we hear people telling us stuff like this it comes off as asinine, unbelievable that someone could actually think in such a way! But people do and it is sad, sad that there are people living with MS, living a constant battle, who also have to deal with this criticism.
Read more »

 

Gut Bacteria and Its Emerging Role in MS





























A growing body of research is unraveling a multitude of ways in which the human gut microbiome has a major impact on health. Microbial dysbiosis has been linked with a variety of diseases, including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular disease, colorectal cancer, and more, underscoring the diffuse role of intestinal bacteria in biological functioning.
Read more »

Friday

 

But You Don’t Look Sick


















Oh, those 5 dreaded words. There are days I want to take them as a compliment, and there are the days where it really just p!sses me off. Sure, it’s great not to look sick, but the fact is, I am! Sometimes I think it would be so much easier if I did just look sick because then others might have some understanding.
Read more »

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TENS Seen as Low Cost and Accessible Way to Ease Spasticity in MS Patients
























Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) might be an option to treat spasticity, one of the more common symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a literature review conducted by researchers from Universidad de Castilla la Mancha, Toledo, and Hospital Nacional de Parapléjicos de Toledo, both in Spain.
Read more »

Thursday

 

Gilenya Seen as Most Effective in Younger and Previously Untreated Patients with Relapsing MS




























A study analyzing results from three Phase 3 clinical trials shows that Gilenya (fingolimod) effectively prevents relapses in different types of relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, with the therapy being most efficient in younger patients and those without previous treatment. The findings highlight the importance of starting treatment early, and not reserving the therapy for patients who fail to respond to other treatments.
Read more »

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Spasticity: Another Symptom of My New MS Normal
























My wife, Caryn, was the first to notice one of the things that seems to be part of my new normal as I recover from my last MS “thing”: She asked me a couple of times about my left hand as I was doing (or trying to do) something that did not involve that appendage.
Read more »


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