FRONT PAGE AMPYRA AUBAGIO AVONEX BETASERON COPAXONE EXTAVIA
Stan's Angels MS News Channel on YouTube GILENYA NOVANTRONE REBIF RITUXAN TECFIDERA TYSABRI
 Daily News for Neuros, Nurses & Savvy MSers: 208,152 Viewers, 8,368 Stories & Studies
Click Here For My Videos, Advice, Tips, Studies and Trials.
Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
Click here to read my columns
Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
CLICK ON THE RED BUTTON BELOW
You'll get FREE Breaking News Alerts on new MS treatments as they are approved
MS NEWS ARCHIVES: by week

HERE'S A FEW OF OUR 6000+ Facebook & MySpace FRIENDS
Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


Click to view 1280 MS Walk photos!

"MS Can Not
Rob You of Joy"
"I'm an M.D....my Mom has MS and we have a message for everyone."
- Jennifer Hartmark-Hill MD
Beverly Dean

"I've had MS for 2 years...this is the most important advice you'll ever hear."
"This is how I give myself a painless injection."
Heather Johnson

"A helpful tip for newly diagnosed MS patients."
"Important advice on choosing MS medication "
Joyce Moore


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Thursday

 

Countdown to Winter
































Image Source: BIGFOTO

By Kim Dolce

Today in southeast Michigan, the temperature reached 88 degrees, humidity 70%. A distant crack of thunder and one, count ‘em one, flash of lightning threatened a storm that never happened. A tornado warning siren suddenly blew while I walked into the grocery store. I barely got inside the door when I was shooed away by the flustered manager who told me the store was closed and I’d have to find cover in some other building. I was not daunted, nor was I scared or worried. Tornado warning sirens in my town are like the boy who cried wolf. After so many false alarms, I just can’t muster up a solid case of gut-wrenching terror anymore. Jaded and complacent, I drove thru McDonald’s for a chicken sandwich on my way home. No deadly twister scooped me up and flung me into oblivion as punishment for my cavalier attitude. Maybe I was protected by mucho layers of good karma. But it’s more than likely that it never would have happened anyway. As far back as I can remember, extreme weather only ever ruffles the edges of the township before wrecking some nice people’s homes in the next town over. What’s more, my little hamlet is like the Bermuda Triangle: You can barely get a signal for your cell phone no matter what carrier you use. People have reported talking to friends on their cells who are driving through my town when their calls were abruptly dropped, and the friend was never heard from again. (Probably not true, but I love telling people that story who aren’t from here.) There’s probably a meteorological explanation for all of this nonsense, but it’s more fun thinking the lost city of Atlantis might somehow be responsible.
Read more »

 

MS: Progression-reduction drug in the pipeline



























A potential oral drug may help prevent and reduce the progression of MS.

MS is a disease of the central nervous system, whereby the immune system attacks tissue in the brain and spinal cord. The damage to the tissue called the myelin sheath - an insulated, fatty covering that protects the nerve fibers - affects how nerves carry electrical signals from the brain and the spinal cord.
Read more »

Labels: ,


Wednesday

 

‘Clinic Speak’ Helps People With MS Take Control




























By Trevis Gleason

The past couple of weeks have been exhausting for me, but at the same time, I’ve been rejuvenated with great information about living our lives with MS.
Read more »

 

Experimental drug may prevent development of MS in mice
































Image Source: HARMANLAW

The experimental drug laquinimod may prevent the development or reduce the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS) in mice, according to research published in the September 21, 2016, online issue of Neurology® Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Read more »

Tuesday

 

Stress Less for Your MS!






























Chronic stress weakens the immune system and increases the risk for a number of illnesses, including heart disease, diabetes, and depression. Most research studies about the effects of stress on MS have been inconclusive, but one recent study by Dr. David Mohr at the University of California, San Francisco, found significant increases in MS relapses following stressful life events, the National MS Society website reports.
Read more »

Labels:


 

FLUOX-PMS: Antidepressant Does Not Slow MS Progression















Image Source: CAMBERPHARMA

Treatment with the antidepressant fluoxetine does not decrease progression in MS, results of a new randomized controlled trial show.
Read more »

Labels:


Monday

 

MS – The Permanent Third Wheel: Moving in with my Boyfriend





























Image Source: KISS100

By Meghan Pcsolyar

Everyone is taught that moving in with your boyfriend/girlfriend is a HUGE step. It is something that you have to seriously think about and talk about. You have to be sure that you can see yourself with that person in the future. When you get into an argument, you can’t just get in your car, drive home, and text your girlfriends about how big of a jerk your boyfriend is. You have to talk it out and come up with a solution, learning to compromise. I have been considering, and it has become increasingly real, how serious moving in with my boyfriend is and we finally made that step two weeks ago.
Read more »

 

Healthy Eating Habits for MS

























A healthy diet for people with MS is not all that different from food recommendations for anyone else.

Finding reliable information about what to eat can be frustrating for a person with MS.
Read more »

Sunday

 

Primary Progressive MS Patients May Soon Have Ocrevus as Treatment





























Results from the ORATORIO trial, exploring Ocrevus (ocrelizumab) for the treatment of primary progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), showed that the drug stopped disease progression for more than two years in more patients than a placebo.
Read more »

Labels:


 

Tips on Parenting When You Have MS




























Caia Images/Paul Bradbury/Getty Images

Communicate openly and share knowledge about MS with your children

By Colleen Doherty, MD

Just as you are not defined by your multiple sclerosis, neither is your parenting. That being said, MS is a part of your life, and so it will play a role in raising your children.
Read more »

Saturday

 

Fighting The Good Fight Against MS


























By: Teresa Wright-Johnson

Hello everyone! Thank you for allowing me the opportunity to share my MS journey with you. I am almost two years into my diagnosis and I must say this has been a life changing experience.
Read more »

 

How ‘tattoo therapy’ might treat MS















Scientists are investigating a way to use temporary tattoos that deliver nanoparticles to treat autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis.
Read more »

Friday

 

Growing Old with MS














































I hate to admit it, but I’m getting kind of old.

That’s not to say that 68 is really old, but I’m probably older than a lot of you who are reading this. I’m also 36 years old in “MS years.” I was diagnosed the month that Ronald Reagan won the Republican nomination to run for U.S. President, August of 1980, so I’ve had MS nearly half of my life. My MS and I have traveled down lots of roads together.
Read more »

 

Nerventra (Laquinimod) Experimental MS Study Results Released: VIDEO

































Image Source: CAPITALWIRED

Laquinimod is a once-daily oral, investigational, CNS-active immunomodulator with a novel mechanism of action being developed for the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), primary-progressive MS (PPMS) and Huntington disease.
Read more »

Labels: ,


Thursday

 

Research findings may pave way for innovative treatments of MS








































Image Source: JONLIEFFMD

Inhibition of the protein kinase CK2 prevents the development of auto-aggressive T cells

Researchers at the Research Center for Immunotherapy (FZI) and the Focus Program Translational Neurosciences (FTN) of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have identified a new mechanism that is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases. On the basis of this new insight, it may prove possible to create innovative treatments for disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The members of the research team headed by Professor Tobias Bopp at the Institute of Immunology at the Mainz University Medical Center and Professor Frauke Zipp at the Department of Neurology, were able to demonstrate that it is possible to influence the development and functioning of regulatory T cells, also known as Tregs, and T helper 17 (TH17) cells by means of inhibition of the protein kinase CK2. It would seem that many of the devastating effects of autoimmune disorders are attributable to TH17 cells.
Read more »

 

Tecfidera: Study illuminates how mystery MS drug works


























The new Scripps Research Institute study de-mystifies the molecular workings of the popular MS drug Tecfidera. Shown here is the crystal structure of adenosine deaminase, one of the protein targets of the drug, with the amino acid it is labeling in pink and neighboring residues associated with a human immunodeficiency in yellow. Credit: The Scripps Research Institute

A study by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has helped to de-mystify the molecular workings of the MS drug Tecfidera. The drug is the most widely prescribed pill-based therapy for MS, but its biological mechanism remains mysterious.
Read more »

Labels: ,


Wednesday

 

Laugh with TV Ads that “Get” Disabilities: VIDEO
























You don’t see people with disabilities very often in television ads.  And when you do, the person with the handicap is usually playing a secondary role or the ad uses the disabled person for an emotional appeal.  It’s not real-life.  It’s not us.
Read more »

Labels:


 

‘Accessible’ Cooking for People With MS
























This past weekend is still a bit of a blur for me. The trip from home to the Dublin airport, plus the flight to London City Airport, plus a short transfer to my hotel near the ExCeL London convention center took most of Friday and left me quite exhausted. And that was just the travel for an event in which I was to participate over the next two days!
Read more »

Tuesday

 

Dr. Melissa Brown from Northwestern University : “Why Sex Matters in Multiple Sclerosis and Other Autoimmune Diseases”: VIDEO






















Sexual problems are often experienced by people with MS, but they are very common in the general population as well. Sexual arousal begins in the central nervous system, as the brain sends messages to the sexual organs along nerves running through the spinal cord. If MS damages these nerve pathways, sexual response — including arousal and orgasm — can be directly affected. Sexual problems also stem from MS symptoms such as fatigue or spasticity, as well as from psychological factors relating to self-esteem and mood changes.
Read more »

Labels: , ,


 

Biomedical researchers break new ground in fight against MS

























Credit: University of Maryland

Researchers from the University of Maryland Fischell Department of Bioengineering and the University of Maryland School of Medicine report a new way to "turn off" the harmful immune attack that occurs during autoimmune diseases such as MS while keeping healthy functions of the immune system intact.
Read more »

Monday

 

Five Ways to Help You Battle Stress and Anxiety


















By Cathy Chester

I’ve always looked forward to summer. I adore warm weather, longer days, the incredible vibrant colors of nature and the choir of crickets, birds, woodpeckers and owls.
Read more »

Labels: ,


 

Animal Fats and MS
























Image Source: PINTEREST

As a person who has MS, I read with great interest “STAT”, an article by Maria Bustillos that appeared recently on the Longreads website. Bustillos describes her very unpleasant experiences when her 24-year-old daughter was diagnosed with MS. She also advances the hypothesis that animal fats are an important and overlooked factor in the cause and progression of MS.
Read more »

Sunday

 

Stem Cell Transplantation Shows High Efficiency




























A high fraction of patients with MS who underwent a transplant with their own bone marrow stem cells after immunosupression therapy, show no signs of disease activity after treatment, according to a new study.
Read more »

Labels: ,


 

Inhibiting the Autoimmune Response to Treat MS: VIDEO






















Treatment options for autoimmune diseases like MS are complicated, because inhibiting the immune system to prevent neural damage simultaneously makes the patient extremely vulnerable to dangerous infections. New research from the University of Maryland aims to bypass the negative side effects while still inhibiting the autoimmune response that leads to the debilitating fatigue, disturbed sensation, and mobility problems associated with MS.
Read more »

Saturday

 

Children with MS at Considerable Risk of Psychiatric Disorders






























Children with MS or other demyelinating conditions experience psychiatric disorders more often than other kids, and  mental health professionals need to be involved early in their care so that those with these disorders are identified and treated early, a new study reported.
Read more »

Labels: ,


 

New way to reprogram lymph node function to fight MS

























Image Source: INVITROGEN

Researchers from the University of Maryland Fischell Department of Bioengineering and the University of Maryland School of Medicine report a new way to "turn off" the harmful immune attack that occurs during autoimmune diseases such as MS, while keeping healthy functions of the immune system intact.
Read more »

Friday

 

Relapsing MS Experimental Therapy Tracker

















































While there are currently several FDA approved therapies on the market for treating patients with Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis, there are many more in the pipeline. These therapies are seeking to improve quality of life in those with the relapsing form of the disease, as well as help halt and even reverse the damage caused to the brain and nervous system.
Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by MULTIPLESCLEROSISNEWSTODAY
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length
Click here to read more

 

Enriching Experiences May Protect Against Cognitive Decline in MS

































Image Source: EQUINETHERAPYASSOCIATES


Researchers examined whether the cognitive reserve hypothesis could predict cognitive decline, gray matter volume changes, and white matter volume changes in MS patients.

Enriching experiences may have a protective role in cognitive performance in MS, reducing the effect that gray matter atrophy has on cognitive functions. These findings were presented at the 32nd Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) in London, September 14-17, 2016.
Read more »

Labels: ,


Thursday

 

Perspectives on Aging with MS






























Image Source: MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS-RESEARCH

Younger and middle aged people with MS may be able to learn from older adults strategies on how to prioritize, modify, and self-manage factors in order to create a plan to age in place, according to the results of recent research. The research was published in the journal Multiple Sclerosis International, and was authored by Elizabeth Wallack of the Recovery & Performance Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, at Memorial University, St. John’s, in Newfoundland, Canada, and colleagues.
Read more »

 

Predicting the severity of MS



























Researchers at Linköping University isolating immune cells from blood samples.
Credit: Image courtesy of Linköping Universitet

Cells in the immune system of patients with MS behave differently from those of healthy individuals. Researchers at Linköping University in Sweden have exploited this difference to develop a method that can predict disease activity in MS.
Read more »

Wednesday

 

Are You in the High Risk Category for Developing MS?






































Early detection is very important for any disease diagnosis. With Multiple Sclerosis, it gives you the opportunity to start a treatment plan early that may help with slowing the progression of the disease.
Read more »

 

The Effects of Alcohol, Coffee, and Smoking on MS
































Image Source: HEALADVICE


Researchers are looking into the possible benefits, if any, of these substances on people with MS.
Read more »

Tuesday

 

Can MS Be Detected by Biomarkers in the Blood? Yes, Study Says

































MicroRNAs present in the blood show promise as potential biomarkers of MS, a new study suggests.
Read more »

Labels:


 

Treating MS with Empathy and Integrity: A Conversation with Juliet Aubrey for the release of Go Now



















































Image Source: JUST-USTAS

Robert Carlyle delivers an astonishing piece of acting’ - Daily Telegraph
‘A big hearted anthem to love and friendship’ - Variety

MS is a neurological condition which affects around 100,000 people in the UK. Highlighting the impact multiple sclerosis has on a young sportsman and his loved ones, Go Now is a heart wrenching, intense and unforgettable film from 1995, and it comes to DVD 20 years after it was originally broadcast by the BBC, courtesy of Simply Media. Starring an outstanding cast with Robert Carlyle (Trainspotting) in the lead role, directed by BAFTA winner Michael Winterbottom' (The- Trip) and written by the multi award winning Jimmy' McGovern (The- Street) and Paul Henry Powell (The Vice).
Read more »

Monday

 

Parents of Youngsters with MS Voice Needs and Frustrations in Study




























A study exploring the difficulties parents experience when their child develops MS found that more support and education — from healthcare and school staff, as well as by parents themselves — is key to easing the burden of a child or teenager with this disease.
Read more »

Labels: ,


 

MS Diagnosis And Treatment: Scientist Challenge Study Linking Gene To The Condition: VIDEO






















A study that came out last June identifying the gene that causes multiple sclerosis has been questioned by other scientists. 
(LSWN.it-Latest Science Web News/YouTube)

Last June, a study came out in Neuron that a gene is responsible for multiple sclerosis. That gene has been identified as NR1H3 by Dr. Carles Vilarino-Guell and his team from the University of British Columbia. However, more and more researchers are emerging to question the study's claims.
Read more »

Sunday

 

The #1 thing you can do for someone with MS or Chronic Illness

















In my long tenure as someone dealing with MS, I have many times found myself talking to the newly diagnosed. Along with that, I’ve also found myself talking to friends, family, and significant others of those who have contracted this disease. They often ask me, what’s the best thing I can I do to help them? My answer is simple: learn about their disease. I’m sure there is a massive helpless feeling that comes with having someone you care about being struck with a horrible, incurable disease. I can certainly understand, as my grandfather also had MS when I was growing up. It wasn’t until I acquired the disease myself and lived with it for a while that I realized what would really help the most: learning about the disease, researching it. Not relying on anecdotal evidence you may have from others is the true way to help us.
Read more »

 

Early intervention benefits patients with MS


























Image Source: MYATTORNEYGREG

Early treatment has long-lasting effects on MS activity, researchers found in a study published in the Aug. issue of Neurology, a medical journal from the American Academy of Neurology. According to a Newswise press release, researchers studied 468 patients randomly assigned to receive either early treatment or placebo.
Read more »

Saturday

 

Have a Say About MS Drugs



























Anyone with a chronic medical problem knows how expensive drugs can be, and how a drug that you need can be here today … gone tomorrow on the list of drugs that your health plan will pay for. You also know that cost and insurance coverage aren’t the only factors in your choice.
Read more »

 

Bold claim of MS gene discovery comes under withering attack























APSTOCK
In MS, neurons lose their myelin coating and no longer transmit signals

Scientists are forcefully challenging a recent study that claimed to identify a rare genetic mutation that sharply boosted the risk of multiple sclerosis. The critics cite calculation errors and say they have been unable to replicate the findings — and question why the original paper was ever published in a top journal.
Read more »

Friday

 

Migraine and Other ‘Common’ Ills Being Mistaken for MS, Study Finds




























Patients with a number of common conditions — some neurological and some autoimmune, but others not — are being mistakenly diagnosed with MS because of difficulties in correctly determining this disease and, possibly, pressure to begin treatment early in the disease’s course, according to a recent study published in the journal Neurology.
Read more »

Labels:


 

Differentiating MS Mimics on MRI









































A proper MS diagnosis can only be made after obtaining imaging from the entire brain and understanding the clinical context.

The accurate diagnosis of MS typically presents several challenges: There is no definitive test for the disease, and symptoms vary widely between patients. The initial symptoms in particular – such as numbness, tingling, and blurred vision, for example – may be highly nonspecific.
Read more »

Thursday

 

Breast Cancer Therapy, Tamoxifen, May Promote Myelin Repair in MS


























Tamoxifen (brand name, Nolvadex), a widely used treatment for breast cancer, can also be used to treat myelin loss in patients with MS, a new study suggests.
Read more »

Labels:


 

How Has MS Affected Your Family Planning or Your Pregnancy?

























By Trevis Gleason

For many years, there’s been anecdotal evidence that multiple sclerosis activity can slow — and some symptoms even improve — during pregnancy. The evidence was so strong that a multiyear study of the effect of hormone therapy to mimic pregnancy has been undertaken to test whether higher levels of a type of estrogen is behind this phenomenon.
Read more »

Labels:


Wednesday

 

What to Do When Cold Weather Worsens MS Symptoms























Cold weather aggravates fatigue and spasticity for some with MS, but that doesn’t mean you have to hibernate all winter.
Read more »

 

Strategies to Curb Treatment Cost in MS



























Image Source: STATEOFDISPARITY

The cost of MS care is rising due to escalating prices of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) over the last several years. Insurers have responded by passing some of the cost to the patient in the form of denying costly therapies or limiting payment, which may have a negative effect on MS care.
Read more »

Tuesday

 

Doc Leaves MS Patient ‘Horrified’ … and Me Too!































By Ed Tobias

The other day I received a very troubling direct message from someone on another Multiple Sclerosis website:

“I was diagnosed with MS in 2004 but, foolishly, dismissed it. Other than bad spacisity [spasticity] and a few little episodes, I was relatively symptom free. That is until 4 days ago. I was fairly active, walking 6 miles a day and biking 6 miles plus a little strength training at the gym then 4 days ago the MS hit me hard! I didn’t know what it was so I went to the doctor where, to my horror, he told me it was due to my MS and said that “for safety, coping better the pain and the obvious, I should be in a wheelchair and using a walker at all times.”
Read more »

 

Personalization, Life, Dignity and Well-Being – Living With A Disability (MS): VIDEO























This video introduces Stephen Page, a man with MS. He emphasises how important it is that he can relate to his PA and chat with her as well as receiving personal assistance and help with basic tasks. Maintaining his social and cultural life is very important to Stephen and having a personal budget has enabled him to continue to attend events which help him to lead his chosen life and preserve his personal identity. He is a creative and talented person who needs to maintain his interests and activities for his own well-being. Stephen emphasises that personalisation can support people as individuals.
Read more »

Labels:


Monday

 

Stress/Anxiety & MS






By Ashley Ringstaff

Now, I don’t know about everyone else… but prior to my diagnosis, I didn’t feel nearly as ‘overwhelmed’ as I do now. Life in general is stressful, of course… family, friends, work… it all can lead to stress at some point. So what’s the big difference with how ‘normal people’ are stressed out… and when an MS patient is stressed out/has anxiety? Well, I’m going to share my 2 cents on that.
Read more »

Labels: ,


 

Inflammation Fighters in Blood Cells Seen to Attack in Entirely New Way


























To reach tissues infected with foreign agents, neutrophils, the body’s first line of defense, need to travel through vessel walls — and do so by switching on a class of adhesion receptors, called integrins, that bind to other adhesion molecules at the surface of the capillary walls. Now, in a recent paper published in Nature Communications, researchers revealed an entirely new way through which neutrophils activate their integrins in preparation to cross a vessel wall.
Read more »


Go to Older News