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Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
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Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
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Saturday

 

Women who breastfeed for more than 15 months are at 53% lesser risk to develop MS






























Women who breastfeed their baby for at least 15 months over one or more pregnancies are at 53% lesser risk to develop MS as compared to those who do not breastfeed at all or do so only for 4 months.  A recent study has claimed so far. Multiple Sclerosis is a disease in which the immune system digests away the protective covering of nerves. The symptoms of this disease include double vision and weakness. Though the treatment can help reduce the symptoms, but this disease cannot be cured. It can last for years or plague a person for lifetime.
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Cognitive-motor interference in MS: What happens when the gait speed is fixed?




During the last decade, numerous studies have confirmed a coupling between walking performance and cognition in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Our aim was to provide new insights into a walking-cognitive dual-task (DT) in PwMS. We tested the DT phenomenon by controlling the walking speed using an instrumented treadmill. Thirty PwMS (20 women) with a mean age 40.1 (SD=12.0) participated in the study. Twenty-one healthy subjects served as controls. Each subject completed a sequence of tests: a) Normal walking (ST) – the participant walked on the instrumented treadmill at a comfortable walking speed for 1min; b) Cognitive evaluation (ST) – subjects performed two cognitive tests while seated; c) DT cognitive tests performed while walking on the treadmill at the identical speed performed during normal walking. Outcome measures were spatio-temporal parameters of gait (mean and variability), the Word List Generation Test (WLG) and the Serial-3 Subtraction Test. MS participants significantly decreased their cadence while increasing their stride length during the DT condition compared to the ST condition. Non-significant differences were observed for the WLG and Serial-3 Subtraction Cognitive Tests between the ST condition and the DT condition in both the MS and healthy groups.

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Tuesday

 

MS and Life Expectancy




























A 7-year difference in life expectancy between the MS population and the general population. Similar results were observed in study 1 (Marrie R. A. et al) and study 2 (Lunde H. M. B. et al).

According to the national MS society, MS is not a fatal illness. There are, however, rare cases of rapid disease progression that can be fatal.
Read more »

 

Dazed and Confused: The Cognitive Issues That Come With My MS


























Image Source: PROGRESIVETHERAPYASSOCIATES

This post will not outline my adventures with medicinal marijuana nor make reference to Cheech or Matthew McConaughey. This post is about the cognitive issues that have turned my life upside down. The cognitive issues that saw me transform from a successful business woman with her own consulting company to someone sitting on a couch who can’t feed herself some days. This post is not meant to make you feel bad for me. Its purpose is to provide insight into the things that are invisible. When someone says, “But you don’t look sick” or “But you look so good,” they don’t see the frayed wires in my head wreaking havoc on the way I perceive the world.
Read more »

Monday

 

Managing the Unpredictability of MS in the Heat


























Heat and humidity can make anyone feel uncomfortable, but for the 400,000 people living with MS in the United States, warmer weather can make life particularly difficult to manage.
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How to Improve MS-Related Imbalance





One of the earliest symptoms that appeared before my MS diagnosis was imbalance. I remember turning my head to look at something and feeling slightly off-balance. I didn’t think much of it at the time, but that wobbly sensation gradually increased through the years.
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Sunday

 

The MS Phantom Itch Sure Feels Real to Me























There are MS symptoms that people can see and that we can explain. There are also invisible symptoms that can be harder to explain — except, of course, when those invisible symptoms become painfully visible.
Read more »

 

Dormant Herpes Virus Can Impede Repair of Myelin Sheath Whose Deterioration Causes MS, Study Reports




























A herpes virus that lies dormant in many people can hinder the repair of the neuron-protecting myelin sheath whose deterioration causes MS, a study reports.
Read more »

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Saturday

 

There's An Amazing New Drug For MS Should I Try It?























Katherine Streeter for NPR

It wasn't long ago that there were no treatments for MS.

In the 1970s, some doctors used chemotherapy to treat the degenerative neurological disease. Since then, more than a dozen drugs have been developed or approved, including infusions, oral medications and self-administered shots.
Read more »

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12 Ways Amazon's Alexa Can Help People with MS






















“Alexa” is Amazon’s talking service that acts as a virtual personal assistant. According to tomsguide.com, as part of the company’s Echo speaker system, the voice-activated device can pick out music tracks for you, operate other electical devices, create to-do lists, and of course help you shop.
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Friday

 

5 Hand Exercises For MS





















Image Source: CLKER

MS is a disease that causes demyelination (disruption of the myelin that insulates and protects nerve cells) of spinal nerve and brain cells.

Although the exact case is unknown, it’s considered to be an autoimmune disease.
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Tips for Managing Cognitive Health With MS























According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, around 65 percent of people living with the disease suffer from some cognitive issues — most notably, memory, concentration and speed of processing information.
Read more »

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Thursday

 

MYELINATION, REMYELINATION AND MS: VIDEO




























Improving our understanding of nerve cell myelination and remyelination in both animal models and humans may to improve treatment for demyelinating diseases such as MS.


Overview
MS is a debilitating autoimmune disease in which immune cells infiltrate the central nervous system and attack the myelin sheath surrounding axons. Dr. Simons explains that myelin is necessary for signal conduction by nerve cells and for the metabolic support of axons. Demyelination results in axonal loss and formation of lesions in the brain. A small percentage of MS lesions are capable of remyelination following steps similar to axonal myelination during normal development. Since lesion remyelination correlates with reduced neurodegeneration, Simons and his colleagues strive to understand why remyelination occurs in only a small number of MS patients and to identify drugs that may promote it.
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Breastfeeding and early periods reduce the risk of developing MS





























Breastfeeding may have protective effects against MS.

Women who breastfed for 15 months were less at risk of developing MS. iStock
Mothers who breastfeed for longer may have a lower risk of developing MS afterwards, scientists have shown. These benefits are seen when they breastfeed for 15 months or more.
Read more »

Wednesday

 

Ubiquitous human herpesvirus 6 may play key role in brain diseases like MS


















The ubiquitous human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) may play a critical role in impeding the brain's ability to repair itself in diseases like MS. The findings, which appear in the journal Scientific Reports, may help explain the differences in severity in symptoms that many people with the disease experience.
Read more »

 

How to Stay Calm During an MRI















“That was the best MRI appointment,” said no one ever, but today I had the least unpleasant MRI.

What makes an MRI bearable?

To begin with, the technician communicated with me the whole way through the procedure. She told me what she would be scanning and how long it would take. For an hour and a half scan, the time passed relatively quickly, as the whole scan was broken up into five- to 10-minute segments. Also, I wasn’t left in a tube with the dimensions of a coffin wondering, how much longer am I going to be in here? Am I ever getting out? Can I scratch my nose now? MRI technicians: take note, do this and you will have a calmer patient on your hands.
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Tuesday

 

Questionnaires can be a good predictor of survival rates in MS


































Image Source: SLIDESHARECDN

The way in which patients with multiple sclerosis answer questionnaires could help to predict their survival rate from the disease, a study has found.
Read more »

 

Hidden herpes virus may play key role in MS, other brain disorders






























The ubiquitous human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) may play a critical role in impeding the brain's ability to repair itself in diseases like MS. The findings, which appear in the journal Scientific Reports, may help explain the differences in severity in symptoms that many people with the disease experience.
Read more »

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Monday

 

Remyelination therapies: a new direction and challenge in MS







































Image Source: MULTIPLESCLEROSISNEWSTODAY

Abstract
MS is characterized by inflammatory activity that results in destruction of the myelin sheaths that enwrap axons. The currently available medications for MS are predominantly immune-modulating and do not directly promote repair. White matter regeneration, or remyelination, is a new and exciting potential approach to treating MS, as remyelination repairs the damaged regions of the central nervous system. A wealth of new strategies in animal models that promote remyelination, including the repopulation of oligodendrocytes that produce myelin, has led to several clinical trials to test new reparative therapies. In this Review, we highlight the biology of, and obstacles to, remyelination.
Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by NATURE
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length

 

Former House Dem reveals MSs diagnosis in healthcare plea




























Image Source: 13NEWSNOW

A former House Democrat is revealing her battle with MS in an op-ed pleading for lawmakers to maintain healthcare coverage for people with pre-existing conditions.

Former Rep. Donna Edwards (D-Md.) said she is worried she won't be able to cover medical costs of nearly $100,000 a year.
Read more »

Sunday

 

5 Ways I Deal With Sensory Overload From MS

















By Kerry-Ann Ferreira

MS has a huge arsenal of tricks up its sleeve so that things that seem oddly random or bizarre may go “undetected.” It means that my symptoms may not be the same as yours, or we may have some of the same symptoms and others not. I am guilty of not reporting a whole host of weird and wonderful symptoms, thinking that it’s just a glitch and that it cannot possibly be related to MS. Some of the things that have been going on inside my body and my head have been so “odd,” like sensory overload, that I had been very reluctant to tell my neurologist about them. That is until, one day, a friend of mine told me that it’s my role to “report the symptoms, not to diagnose them.”
Read more »

 

Minocycline May Slow Progression From Clinically Isolated Syndrome to MS


















Minocycline, a broad-spectrum tetracycline antibiotic, reduces risk of conversion from clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) to MS.

Minocycline, a broad-spectrum tetracycline antibiotic, reduces risk of conversion from clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) to MS.Minocycline, a broad-spectrum tetracycline antibiotic, reduces risk of conversion from clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) to MS.
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Saturday

 

High-Res Images of the Brain’s White Matter Could Help Researchers Understand MS




I’ve always had an image in my head of what the so-called white matter of the brain — the part most affected by MS— looks like. Boy, was I wrong!
Read more »

 

5 Tools Used to Diagnose MS










It’s never a good idea to jump to conclusions when trying to find a cause for any symptoms you might have. With MS, self-diagnosing is not the way to go. This disease may cause permanent damage even in its earliest stages so it’s crucial to get it properly diagnosed as soon as possible.
Read more »

Friday

 

To Speaker Ryan and the GOP, From a Woman With MS








Dear Speaker Ryan and the GOP,

Here’s a picture of me waiting to learn the details of how the #AHCA would impact my health care, preexisting conditions and disability, taken while I get my six hour immunotherapy infusion. Treatment for my progressive, incurable, neurodegenerative, autoimmune disease.
Read more »

 

Lipoic Acid, an Over-the-counter Antioxidant, Seen to Slow Brain Atrophy in SPMS Patients























The over-the-counter antioxidant lipoic acid slowed brain deterioration in patients with secondary progressive MS (SPMS), according to a pilot study.
Read more »

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Thursday

 

My MS Mask: VIDEO


















Living with MS, I often feel like I’m wearing a mask.

A disguise of sorts, for protection. But sometimes, it’s hard to tell who I’m protecting more – myself or the others around me.
Read more »

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Sex, Intimacy and MS



























On July 26, 2017 GeneFo will be hold a free webinar on Sex, Intimacy and MS.
Read more »

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Wednesday

 

Link Between MS Therapy Tysabri and Melanoma Possible, an Adverse Reactions Watchdog Group Says






















The MS therapy Tysabri (natalizumab) could trigger melanoma, the Southern Network on Adverse Reactions (SONAR) has warned.
Read more »

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MS: Antioxidant may slow disease progression






























Researchers found that lipoic acid reduced whole brain atrophy in patients with SPMS.

New research offers hope for patients with MS, after finding that a common over-the-counter antioxidant may help to slow the condition.

In a pilot study, researchers found that taking a high dose of lipoic acid every day for 2 years reduced whole brain atrophy among patients with secondary progressive MS (SPMS), compared with a placebo.
Read more »

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Tuesday

 

How to Stay Cool With MS





























“My number one tip for MS patients is to precool before going out on a warm day.” (ISTOCKPHOTO)

It’s summertime, and that means backyard barbecues, relaxing on the beach or by the pool, enjoying outdoor sports, catching a few rays and taking walks through the countryside. For most folks, activities like these are tons of fun. But if you’re one of the 400,000 Americans with MS, hot and steamy days can be a time of heat-related health challenges.
Read more »

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The Genetics of MS





























 MS and Your Genes. Thomas Tolstrup / Getty Images

Immune System Genes Linked to MS

Your genes are an important factor in whether or not you are at risk for developing MS, as supported by both family and scientific studies.
Read more »


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