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Saturday

 

Biogen’s CEO Is Out After Management Changes, Stalled Sales


































George Scangos
Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg
  • George Scangos to leave in ‘coming months’; search beginning
  • Adjusted earnings beat estimates; share buyback announced
Biogen Inc. Chief Executive Officer George Scangos, who helped build the U.S. drugmaker into a powerful player in multiple sclerosis treatments, will leave the company after a series of top managers were replaced and sales of its biggest product stalled.
Read more »

 

Change to MRI Criteria Would Diagnose MS Earlier





























A new proposal to change the current imaging criteria for the diagnosis of MS to include the symptomatic lesion has been put forward, after a preliminary study has suggested that this would identify patients earlier.
Read more »

Friday

 

Study of Potential Therapy for Relapsing MS That Targets B-Cells Now Recruiting Patients in US



































Patients with relapsing MS are being recruited for a clinical trial evaluating an experimental monoclonal antibody called ublituximab, the National MS Society announced in a recent news release. The study, being conducted at seven U.S. sites, will enroll at least 24 patients, but this number can go up to 100.
Read more »

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‘My Super Diet Cured My MS! Buy My Book!’











































There seems to be general agreement that achieving and keeping an overall level of good health is very important for people living with multiple sclerosis, or with any chronic illness for that matter. And one way to reach that goal, many will say, is to eat a healthy, well-balanced diet.
Read more »

Thursday

 

Beat the Heat and Chill!










































Image Source: UMPATTIRE

By Laura Kolaczkowski

Polar Products, the company that makes a full line of various cooling vest products, wrist and ankle wraps, neck coolers and more, was one of the exhibitors at the recent Consortium for MS Centers 2016 annual meeting and I had time to talk with the company’s owner, William Graessle, owner and CEO, about their product line. Bill is one of those guys who will talk with anyone about his product because he has a real passion for being a good corporate citizen and has become a friend of the MS community. His company sells the large majority of their products to commercial and government customers such a road construction and airport workers who spend long hours in the heat. The market to help people with multiple sclerosis and other diseases that make the affected person sensitive to the heat is much smaller, but for him it is much more satisfying.
Read more »

 

More Evidence Links Season of Birth and Risk for MS































Image Source: DERBYSHIRENC

A new study of more than 21,000 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) in the United Kingdom (UK) provides further evidence that season of birth can influence the risk for MS and that this association cannot be explained away by "background patterns."
Read more »

Wednesday

 

An antibody-based drug for MS


















































Image Source: MEDCITYNEWS

Inserm Unit U919, directed by Prof. Denis Vivien ("Serine Proteases and Physiopathology of the Neurovascular Unit") has developed an antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis. The study, directed by Fabian Docagne and published in Brain, paves the way for a new strategy to control the disease.
Read more »

 

MS Cures in the News, Again





































Image Source: HONEYBEES-BEESWAX

You know you are in for a story when someone, usually a stranger or the next best thing such as a very casual acquaintance, tells you ‘my aunt had MS but she cured it with ________ (fill in your choice of ‘cures’).
Read more »

Tuesday

 

Finally, Attention Switches To Progressive MS


















































Gray matter atrophies in primary progressive MS

A surge of new MS treatments have been for the relapsing-remitting form of the disease. A new drug that targets CD20-positive B cells may change that.
Read more »

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How Caregivers Can Help With MS Tests and Medical Appointments





























Learn what you can do to help a loved one with multiple sclerosis deal with medical tests and treatments.
Read more »

Monday

 

8 Tips for Talking About Your MS





























The who, what, when, where, and how of explaining your MS diagnosis to others.

Revealing and talking about a health condition or medical problem can be a highly emotional undertaking. Many people feel afraid or anxious about their listener’s possible reaction — and sometimes that anxiety is justified. On the other hand, a positive or supportive response can be reassuring and bring the listener and teller closer together.
Read more »

 

Steroid Use Lowers Oxidative Stress in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Progressive MS Patients in Pilot Study


































A pilot study in patients with progressive MS found a steroid treatment of benefit by decreasing oxidative stress in the cerebrospinal fluid. The study, “One-time intrathecal triamcinolone acetonide application alters the redox potential in cerebrospinal fluid of progressive multiple sclerosis patients: a pilot study,” was published in the journal Therapeutic Advances in Neurological Disorders.
Read more »

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Sunday

 

In the End Everything Will Be OK




















By Matt Allen G

Living with a chronic disease like MS is not easy, even if it looks to be that way to those around us. There are so many different types of struggles MS can bring about in our lives and so many different types of pain be it physical or emotional. The stress can be overwhelming! What really sucks is that because the disease is chronic so is the struggle; well, it may seem that way to many at least. Never-ending… There is a quote, I cannot figure out who originally said it (there is too much debate online), that I have always used as my sort of motto after being diagnosed with MS; it’s what I have to always remind myself of when times get tough. It goes something like this;
Read more »

 

Nanobionic Clothing Seen to Help Clear Body of Free Radicals Associated with MS and Other Diseases

















































A recent study in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry and Toxicology reported that the impact of disease-causing free radicals on the human body may be mitigated by wearing special, high-tech “Nanobionic” clothing for just a few hours a day. These clothes are designed to protect the body from the free radicals it produces, which, when in excess of the its natural protective abilities, can result in oxidative stress and lead to cellular damage.
Read more »

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Saturday

 

Patients Need To Know What Drugs Do Inside Our Bodies


































Oral therapy Tecfidera (dimethyl fumarate) seems to be emerging as a first-line treatment for relapsing multiple sclerosis – according to Biogen, the company that developed it. That’s good news, and something we need to know.
Read more »

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6 Things MS Nurses Wish Their Patients Would Do — And Why





















From more exercise to better communication, here's what nurses think would help people with multiple sclerosis the most.
Read more »

Friday

 

New software tool could help routinely measure brain atrophy in MS patients

































Image Source: TECHNOLOGY.ORG

The loss of brain tissue, called brain atrophy, is a normal part of aging, but multiple sclerosis (MS) accelerates the process. Such atrophy is a critical indicator of physical and cognitive decline in MS, yet because measuring brain atrophy is expensive and complicated, it's done primarily in research settings.
Read more »

 

The Importance of Having a Support Network When You Live With MS





























By Trevis Gleason

First, thank you all for your kind messages of support as I try to find my literal and figurative balance again. Your comments on the blog and social media, along with emails, have been heartening.
Read more »

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Thursday

 

The Adaptive Yoga Book For People Living With MS


















































Image Source: YOGAFORDEPRESSION

By Cathy Chester

I met many fascinating and brilliant people at the recent Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Center’s annual meeting, including those I met in the exhibit hall. One such person manning (or is it “womaning”) a booth was Mindy Eisenberg, yoga therapist, author and a woman who dedicates her life to helping people with multiple sclerosis. After watching her mother battle a downward spiral with the disease she knew she had to do something to help others.
Read more »

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Side Effects and Convenience of MS Therapies Seen to Determine Patients’ Adherence to Them




























Image Source: RUANGIDEA

Despite the existence of several disease-modifying drugs for people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), patients’ satisfaction plays a critical role in their adherence to treatment. Improving adherence should be a major concern in the clinic to prevent patients from evolving to more debilitating stages of the disease.
Read more »

Wednesday

 

Telemedicine Can Make Life Easier for MS Patients





























For people with MS, the growing field of telemedicine could offer quick relief from a disease known for its inconveniences.

People living with MS find they can use new technology to obtain information and receive physical therapy without having to leave their homes.
Read more »

 

Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) for MS from the Inside: A Patient’s View
































Image Source: PAINMANAGEMENTINSTITUTE&AESTHETICS

Editor’s Note: The opinions expressed in this blog article are not those of Multiple Sclerosis News Today, or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to Multiple Sclerosis. 

Anyone considering HSCT for MS might like to know what they can expect. But let’s remember that, while such transplants for MS patients are available in clinics worldwide — from Mexico to the Philippines and Singapore, and from Israel to Russia — HSCT remains an experimental treatment that lacks formal approval from health authorities.
Read more »

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Tuesday

 

New jab that creates 'killer cells' could help fight against MS: VIDEO































The new jab might be the hope to those suffering from multiple sclerosis

A NEW drug that creates natural ‘killer cells’ in the body has been hailed as a great leap forward in the fight against multiple sclerosis.
Read more »

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MS Patient’s Pick of the Week’s News: Tremors, Tecfidera, MRI, Progression, and Caregivers






















Image Source: LEHIGHACRESGAZETTE

There have been plenty of interesting stories on Multiple Sclerosis News Today over the last seven days. Here is my Pick of the Week’s news.
Read more »

Monday

 

Brain Atrophy in MS Patients May Soon Be More Easily and Routinely Examined




































Detecting brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients requires high quality scans, too expensive and complicated for routine clinical use. But this may change with a new software that simplifies the calculation of brain atrophy based on data from routine magnetic resonance images (MRI).
Read more »

 

LI scientist finds new way to detect MS








































Dr. Eitan M. Akirav, at his Mineola lab on July 5, 2016, has found a new way to detect multiple sclerosis that holds promise for earlier diagnosis. Photo Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • A biomarker, or signpost of the disease, seen in DNA in blood
  • Autoimmune disorder causes neurological disability
Read more »

Sunday

 

Have Your Say About Disease Modifying Therapies for RRMS

































You have just one week from today to have your say about the effectiveness of various disease modifying therapies (DMT) used to treat relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Public comments are welcome in response to an early draft paper that is planned to be the basis for a future report to evaluate the health and economic outcomes of multiple treatment regimens for relapsing remitting MS.
Read more »

 

The link of inflammation and neurodegeneration in progressive MS: STUDY































Image Source: OXFORDJOURNALS
Read more »

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Saturday

 

MS Stem Cell Therapy: What Would YOU Like to Know?





























By Trevis Gleason

Research on stem cell therapy for MS shows promise.The past couple of weeks have seen the Life With Multiple Sclerosis inbox and social media pages loaded with people sharing “news” of the latest MS stem cell research out of Canada. I’m sure many of you have had similar experiences.
Read more »

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Lessons in How to Cope with MS




































Dr. Barry Farr

Dr. Barry Farr remembers his first inkling of Multiple Sclerosis as a day when he was 20, doing push-ups in his bedroom in Mississippi and his arm spontaneously collapsed under him. There seemed no explanation for it. Many years later came another episode, a foot drop stumble as he was walking to his office at U.Va., where he was a professor of medicine, an expert on infectious disease. That time his medical advisors said it wasn’t enough info to go on for a diagnosis.
Read more »

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Friday

 

Brain inflammation linked to depression in MS




























Image Source: UPLIFTCONNECT

Patients with multiple sclerosis have higher rates of depression than the general population, including people with other life-long disabling diseases. Symptoms of multiple sclerosis arise from an abnormal response of the body's immune system. Immune response has also been linked to depression, leading researchers to think it could be a shared pathological mechanism that leads to the increased rates of depressive symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis.
Read more »

 

Brain Health: Time Matters in MS

























Gavin Giovannoni, MD, and MS specialist, is a favorite doctor of mine, even though he can’t treat me as a patient. He resides in England and treats people there and works extensively in the research field of multiple sclerosis and patient centered research and treatment. If there were someone to clone and bring here to the United States for MS work and patient care, my choice would be Dr. Giovannoni. At times when I read his Barts MS Blog, “A Blog for People Affected by MS Interpreting Good, Bad and Other Research News”, I picture him as the Spaniard Don Quixote, battling the windmills. He is outspoken and doesn’t hesitate to challenge that the way we are treating MS is not good enough and doesn’t shy away from any argument on the behalf of people with MS.
Read more »

Thursday

 

Using stem cell treatments, some MS patients see reversal, easing of disease symptoms





























Image Source: THESCIENCEBEHINDSCIENCE

Eatontown, N.J.-based American CryoStem Corporation (CRYO) says it's seeing a growing number of people storing their own stem cells, in case they encounter a neurodegenerative disease or orthopedic injury

For the 400,000 Americans with MS, using their own harvested adult stem cells to reset their immune systems may help reverse some of the symptoms that often come with the disease.
Read more »

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Tremors Linked to MS Poorly Treated with Symptomatic Medication, Study Finds

































Disabling tremors can affect as many as half of all people with MS, but they are inadequately treated because of limited therapeutic options and are not sufficiently being studied, researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham reported.
Read more »

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Wednesday

 

MS Patient’s Pick of the Week’s News































Developments of treatments for MS dominate my pick of the week’s news in MS News Today. Included is a vaccine and a new oral drug.
Read more »

 

Advanced MS: What to Expect

























Image Source: CRISASANTO

As with many diseases, multiple sclerosis can become so severe and progressive that it becomes what is referred to as "late" or "end stage."
Read more »

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Tuesday

 

Tracking brain atrophy in MS could become routine, thanks to software developed at UB






































Brain scans of patients scanned with different MRI machines. The ventricles — the cavity between brain tissue, and a key predictor of disability progression in multiple sclerosis — are highlighted in red in each scan, with a 3-D rendering in red added to each set of images. A new software tool developed by University at Buffalo researchers enables the accurate identification and quantification of each person's ventricular volume despite variability in the shape of each person’s brain and in the scanning technology used to produce such scans. Credit: Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, Department of Neurology, University at Buffalo

International UB study starting next month aims to validate software to assess brain atrophy in more than 1,000 MS patients
Read more »

 

Scientists want to use parasitic worms to treat MS






















It might sound creepy, but researchers are investigating if parasitic worms could be the key to halting the progression of MS - an autoimmune condition that causes the body to attack its own nerve cells.
Read more »

Monday

 

8 Tips for Talking About Your MS























By Michele Bloomquist

The who, what, when, where, and how of explaining your multiple sclerosis diagnosis to others.
Read more »

 

MS Patients Have Altered Microbiome That May Benefit From Dietary Changes































Dr. Ashutosh Mangalam

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ashutosh K Mangalam PhD

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?
Read more »

Sunday

 

Health Insurance Status Affects Medication Use in MS































Image Source: THECENTURYFOUNDATION

Rising costs and insurance coverage of disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) for multiple sclerosis adversely impact access to treatment, according to results from a large survey.
Read more »

 

Coherus’ Oral Therapy for Relapsing MS Seen to Reduce Brain Lesions by Half in Phase 2b Trial


































Coherus BioSciences recently reported that its candidate therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS), CHS-131, reduced the development rate of new brain lesions by nearly 50% in previously untreated relapsing-remitting MS patients.
The Phase 2b trial (NCT02638038), randomizing patients to receive either CHS-131 or placebo in a double-blind manner, also showed the treatment did not give rise to many of the side effects linked to other oral MS drugs.
Read more »

Saturday

 

Software can Routinely Track Brain Atrophy in MS





































Image Source: BIOSCIENCE

Brain atrophy, the loss of brain tissue is a normal part of aging, but MS accelerates the process. Such atrophy is a critical indicator of physical and cognitive decline in MS, yet because measuring brain atrophy is expensive and complicated, it's done primarily in research settings.
Read more »

 

Cognitive status in patients with MS in Lanzarote: STUDY

Friday

 

Community Feedback: How to Beat the Heat with MS




















By Editorial Team

“Remember the kids who only came out at night because the sun caused problems for them? MS kind of reminds me of that when the heat is on and we can’t be out without problems.”
Read more »

 

Vaccine to Treat MS Showing Promise and Soon to Enter Phase 3 Clinical Testing


































A new vaccine for patients with MS, called Xemys, is showing positive results in pre-clinical and clinical trials, and is soon to enter Phase 3 clinical testing. Xemys was developed by researchers at the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences and their colleagues.
Read more »

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Thursday

 

Gut bacteria could help diagnose MS























Image courtesy of Flickr/NIAID

Scientists have discovered that a difference in gut bacteria in people with MS, compared to the general population could be used as to diagnose and track the condition, according to a new study.

Read more »

 

1st Potential Therapy for Primary Progressive MS, Ocrelizumab, Under Priority Review by FDA

































The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is giving priority review to a request to approve Ocrevus (ocrelizumab) as a treatment for both forms of multiple sclerosis, the drug’s developer, Genentech, announced. If the company’s Biologics License Application (BLA) is approved, Ocrevus will become the first drug able to treat patients with either relapsing or primary progressive MS.
Read more »

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Wednesday

 

Obesity linked to increased risk of MS







































Image Source: CDC/Debora Cartagena

Individuals who are obese in early adulthood face a heightened risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to new research conducted by Dr. Brent Richards of the Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital, Quebec, Canada and colleagues, published in PLOS Medicine. This result provides further confirmation of previous observational studies that had suggested the existence of such a link. MS is a progressive neurological disorder which can lead to disability and death, involving damage to the myelin which surrounds nerves in the spinal cord and brain. Causes of the disease are poorly understood, although immune-mediated mechanisms are likely. Currently available treatments have only modest effects on the disease and its symptoms, which underlines the importance of identifying preventive measures.
Read more »

 

Time- and Region-Specific Season of Birth Effects in Multiple Sclerosis in the United Kingdom ONLINE: STUDY




























Image Source: GLOGSTER
Read more »

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