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Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
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Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
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Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


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Saturday

 

Look Your Best With MS: Grooming Tips for Men and Women























The right equipment and a simplified look can make grooming easier when you have MS.Josef Lindau/Getty Images; Stocksy

Weakness, fatigue, and tremors can get in the way of maintaining your appearance, but these tips and techniques will help keep you looking good.

Kathleen Matuska, PhD, an occupational therapist and chair of the department of occupational science and occupational therapy at St. Catherine University in St. Paul, Minnesota, once worked with a patient with MS who almost quit a job that she valued and enjoyed. The reason: The woman found her morning grooming routine so exhausting that she felt wiped out by the time she got into her car to drive to work.
Read more »

 

Neuroprotection: A Possible Future Treatment for MS
























Research into new treatments for MS is ongoing and scientists are continuously discovering new ways to tackle the disease. There is one area of research that’s showing promising results: neuroprotection.
Read more »

Friday

 

Don’t Apologize For Having Fun




















For most people, despite appearances, living with MS isn’t easy.  We’re plagued by severe fatigue, pain, spasms, and a bunch of other invisible symptoms. Life with MS is also wildly unpredictable, so we never know when these symptoms will pop up suddenly and cause us to cancel plans.  In short, living with MS is like riding an unpleasant roller coaster with a lot of high points and low points.  Because of the deceptive nature of the disease, it’s easy to be (or at least feel) judged much of the time when we are at one of those high points, when we are able to at least appear “normal” and have fun.  With all that judgment, whether real or imagined, it’s easy to feel guilty for occasionally having a good time.  I’m here to say that you need to move past that and to tell everyone that you don’t need to apologize for having fun sometimes.  You’ve earned it!
Read more »

 

Bioengineers Use Quantum Dots to Help Develop New Therapies for MS


























The National Multiple Sclerosis Society estimates that MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide. [sleddogtwo/Getty Images]

Sounds of Science Podcasts

Team believes a rational therapeutic design approach will allow scientists to transform how the disease is tackled. Quantum dot technology also should be applicable to other autoimmune diseases as well.
Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by GENETICENGINEERING&BIOTCHNOLOGYNEWS
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length

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Thursday

 

Involving Patients in Decision Making Improves MS Treatment




























Image Source: WORDPRESS

Shared decision-making between patients and their doctors and nurses is one of the cornerstones of multiple sclerosis treatment, according to a report in the journal Practical Neurology.
Read more »

 

Exosomes in Relapsing-Remitting MS Have Distinct RNA Profile



































Image Source: NEUROLOGYADVISOR

Circulating exosomes have a distinct RNA profile in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), according to a study published in the Annals of Neurology.
Read more »

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Wednesday

 

Hidden and invisible symptoms of MS: VIDEO

























Produced for MS Awareness Month 2016 this excellent video from Melly ManyLemons looks at the hidden and invisible symptoms of MS.
Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided bPATIENTTALK
Note: Materials may be edited for content and length

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MS study reveals possible trigger

























3D illustration of nerve cells via Shutterstock.com

Israeli scientists discover an abnormality in neurons’ protective membrane may enable the immune system to launch a mistaken attack.

Researchers have long speculated that MS is triggered by the body’s own immune system unleashing an uncontrolled attack on myelin sheaths that protect nerve cells (neurons).
Read more »

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Tuesday

 

National MS Society Highlights Diet, Lifestyle Research Focusing on Living Well With MS






















The National MS Society has selected research highlights from a recent MS conference in an effort to help make living with the disease less burdensome.
Read more »

 

Air Pollution May Trigger Relapses in MS Patients, French Study Finds























Air pollution, particularly tiny inhalable particles around 10 micrometers in diameter, is a likely trigger for relapses in MS patients, a French study reports.
Read more »

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Monday

 

Nanoparticle delivery of leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF), of possible use in treating MS






















Image Source: MCCORMICK

Paragraph 2: The invention is in the field of compositions for neuroprotection, particularly compositions that promote and protect neural cells in the central nervous system of a mammal such as a human. Also described are methods for repairing tissues of the central nervous system of a mammal such as a human. Neurodegenerative diseases represent the largest area of unmet clinical need in the Western world. They are characterised by a progressive loss of the structure or function of neurons in the nervous system (neurodegeneration) and include Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Parkinson's Disease (PD) and a host of other rarer conditions such as Huntington's Disease (HD), Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). The process of neurodegeneration is not well understood and so the diseases that stem from it have no effective cures, nor is it possible to slow down their progression, as yet. 
Read more »

 
























By combining an experimental stem cell treatment with a nanoparticle delivery system, researchers may eventually stop MS and other autoimmune diseases.

An innovative stem cell therapy could change how we treat MS, but are we any closer to a cure?

Read more »

Sunday

 

8 Tips for Dealing With the Heat When You Have MS






















Many people living with MS find that their symptoms become more pronounced when they are subjected to heat. With summer arriving in most parts of the country, many people with the condition will soon experience a temporary worsening of symptoms. (The same can happen if the person takes a bath or shower that’s too hot.) According to verywell.com, the symptoms affected could include blurred vision, fatigue, tremors, numbness, cognitive abilities, and general weakness. Thankfully, the symptoms ease off when the weather cools down.
Read more »

 

Manage MS after pregnancy by following this diet


























MUM'S THE WORD: Sharon Ni Chonchuir and her Milo at their home in Dingle, Co Kerry. Picture: Domnick Walsh

When MS sufferer Sharon Ní Chonchúir gave birth to her son in December she dropped her strict diet. She soon found the familiar symptoms returning.
Read more »

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Saturday

 

Pricing of Ocrevus and What it Means for MS Treatments















Image Source: DITCHCARB

By Laura Kolaczkowski

There were no big surprises in the March 2017 announcement of the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) approval of Ocrevus, the brand name for ocrelizumab, the latest disease modifying therapy (DMT)  for MS, Ocrevus is manufactured by Genentech Roche.  The FDA review process had been slow and even postponed for an additional 3 months, but very few people who have followed this drug’s development didn’t expect it to eventually get approval for use in relapsing remitting and progressive forms of MS.
Read more »

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MS research boosted by modeled brain cells
































 

Researchers at The Salk Institute have developed a way to grow vital brain cells called astrocytes from stem cells, a potential breakthrough for basic and clinical research into several diseases, including MS.
Read more »

Friday

 

Is a Cure for MS Just Around the Corner?































MS sufferer and campaigner Linda Jarrett

An expert from the University of Nottingham has given his views on claims that a cure for MS could be within our grasp.

A company in Cambridge called LIFNano is trying to cure MS using a protein in the body known as LIF, or Leukaemia Inhibitory Factor.
Read more »

 

SPMS Patients Have Higher Illness Burden than RRMS Patients, Kantar Health Study Shows






















Patients with secondary progressive MS (SPMS) have a higher burden of illness than patients with relapsing-remitting MS, a new study showed.
Read more »

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Thursday

 

Let’s Address The Elephant in the Room-Depression and MS
































Image Source: CUNTINGLINGUIST


By Calie Wyatt

I want to write about something that I feel is sadly, often swept under the rug and left to go unnoticed. It’s that giant elephant in the room that is often present, but most seem to look right past it. That something is depression. This is an issue I have dealt with the majority of my life. It is something that’s for some reason is often looked down upon and misconstrued. But, it’s something more people than we realize struggle with too. Depression is fairly common but still widely misunderstood and stigmatized. This stigma associated with depression can cause feelings of shame and embarrassment. But, we shouldn’t feel that way. I believe if less people were affected by the stigma associated with MS than more people would be open to talk about it and willing to get help.
Read more »

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Stressful Environment Triggers Inflammatory Cells Linked to Autoimmune Diseases Like MS, Study Shows





















A stressful microenvironment, characterized by low metabolites and low oxygen levels, triggers the generation of immune cells directly implicated in a variety of inflammatory diseases, such as MS.
Read more »

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Wednesday

 

Natural Remedy Dos and Don’ts for MS


























Before you spend money on natural remedies, learn which may be helpful for MS, and which likely are not. Think stock

More and more people with MS are looking into so-called natural remedies — mostly herbs, vitamins, and supplements — as alternatives, or complements, to prescription drug treatment.
Read more »

 

Sodium Intake And Its Association With MS Progression























Image Source: PRITIKIN

There is no association between average 24-hour urine sodium levels and conversion from clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) to clinically definite MS, according to a study published in the Annals of Neurology.

Read more »

Tuesday

 

Chef Trevis Gleason’s No. 1 ‘Life With MS’ Hack



























Most of our long-time readers, and even many who may have recently found us, know that I formerly pursued my professional passions in the culinary field. I was classically trained and worked for many years as a chef. MS took away my ability to do the things a chef must do: stand for long periods, work in hot environments, slice and chop ingredients, and attend to the budgeting, costing, and scheduling of the kitchen.
Read more »

 

National MS Society Joins Other Groups Urging Reform of U.S. Law Protecting Disabled Airline Passengers
























The National Multiple Sclerosis Society and a dozen other advocacy groups have banded together to support the Air Carrier Access Amendments Act of 2017, a bill seeking to strengthen the rights of airline passengers and close service gaps often faced by patients with disabilities, including those with MS.
Read more »

Monday

 

New Way of Growing Astrocytes from Stem Cells May Aid Research into Brain Disorders Like MS




















Researchers at The Salk Institute have developed a way to grow vital brain cells called astrocytes from stem cells, a potential breakthrough for basic and clinical research into several diseases, including MS.
Read more »

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18 Common Home Modifications to Improve Life With MS























As your MS progresses, you may find it necessary to make some modifications to your home to make it safer and more accessible. Such alterations can vastly improve the quality of life for people living with the disease, allowing them to regain some independence and making life more comfortable.
Read more »

Sunday

 

Pseudobulbar Affect – a possible symptom of MS: VIDEO

























This video is about a lesser known symptoms of MS.
Read more »

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Further evidence statins could help control MS
































Credit: University College London

A dose of the drug simvastatin results in cognitive improvement in people with secondary progressive MS (SPMS), according to research published in The Lancet Neurology.
Read more »

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Saturday

 

Unlocking the Mystery of MS with Tech


































myMS is the world's first smartphone app capable of collecting large amounts of clinical, imaging and genetic data for people with MS.  Credit: Courtesy Keck School of Medicine of USC

Newswise — LOS ANGELES – What if a single smartphone app could help solve the enigma of MS and move new treatments ahead at lightning speed? That was the bold idea that led Keck Medicine of USC neurologist Daniel Pelletier, MD, professor of neurology at the Keck School of Medicine of USC and division chief of the Neuro-Immunology and USC Multiple Sclerosis Center, to develop myMS, the world’s first smartphone app capable of collecting large amounts of clinical, imaging and genetic data for people with MS. Enrollment is now underway for a pilot study of the app.
Read more »


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