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Timothy L. Vollmer, MD
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Professor

Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center

Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center
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Brian R. Apatoff, MD, PhD
Multiple Sclerosis Institute
Center for Neurological Disorders

Associate Professor Neurology and Neuroscience,

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Clinical Attending in Neurology,
New York-Presbyterian Hospital
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Timothy L. Vollmer M.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Co-Director of the RMMSC at Anschutz Medical Center
and
Medical Director-Rocky Mountain MS Center


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Sunday

 

UCR scientists find possible link between MS patients' nerve-covering damage and seizures





























Seema Tiwari-Woodruff, associate professor of biomedical sciences, shows an image of postmortem MS brain section with inflammation in the laboratory at the UC Riverside School of Medicine Research Building in Riverside on Friday, March 24, 2017. UC Riverside scientists have found a possible link between the loss of protective nerve fiber coverings and seizures in multiple sclerosis patients.
Watchara Phomicinda, Staff Photographer

UC Riverside scientists believe they’ve found a possible link between the loss of protective nerve fiber coverings or “demyelination” and seizures in multiple sclerosis patients.
Read more »

 

3 Tips for Newly Diagnosed Multiple Sclerosis Patients






















Being diagnosed with MS can be devastating and will often take time to come to terms with the news. You will undoubtedly need to make some lifestyle changes, but it’s important to realize that you can still live a very happy and productive life with the condition. Here are our top three tips for coping with an MS diagnosis with help from keepsmyelin.ca.
Read more »

Saturday

 

When MS Causes Skin Symptoms





Itching, pain, and crawling sensations on the skin can take a mental and physical toll. Treating these MS symptoms often requires trial and error.

Virtually all symptoms of MS are a result of the damage MS does to the brain and spinal cord.
Read more »

 

Disproven Theories About the Causes of MS and Its Flare-ups





While some MS causes have been nixed, smoking and Vitamin D deficiency are both still associated with the risk for developing MS. (GETTY IMAGES)

Science may get closer to actual causes when it learns what doesn't trigger the disease.

You may hear about a lot of potential causes of multiple sclerosis, the progressive, incurable disease that damages the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. Theories have ranged from genetic to environmental triggers, some as simple as living with a pet.
Read more »

Friday

 

Tom Youngs: Ex-Cambridge United striker on his battle with multiple sclerosis


























GETTY IMAGES
Cambridge United fans used to chant "Tom Youngs has got A Levels" at the striker

For 10 years, Tom Youngs' biggest concern was keeping supporters happy while doing "one of the best jobs in the world". These days, aged only 37, he is facing the far more "scary" prospect of living with MS.
Read more »

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New Gene Interaction Associated With Increased MS Risk

























A disease in which the body’s own immune system attacks nerve cells in the spinal cord and brain, MS is a major cause of neurological disease in younger adults, from 20 to 50 years of age, and disproportionally affects women. While treatable, there is no cure for MS, which can lead to problems with vision, muscle control, balance, basic body functions, among other symptoms, and could lead to disability. NeuroscienceNews.com image is adapted from the UTMB Galveston press release.

A person carrying variants of two particular genes could be almost three times more likely to develop MS, according to the latest findings from scientists at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Duke University Medical Center.
Read more »

Thursday

 

Who Really Benefits From Pharma Patient Assistance Programs?
























Just about any time we mention the price of medications for MS, as we did in a post last week, many people comment that they rely on so-called patient assistance programs from drug manufacturers to help pay for their meds.
Read more »

 

Kadimastem Obtains US Patent for Neurodegenerative Disease Stem Cell Technology


























The United States has granted a patent to Kadimastem’s stem cell-based technology for treating MS and other diseases of the nervous system.
Read more »

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Wednesday

 

Anxiety as a Predictor of Depression in MS
































Image  Source: SANDIEGOFAMILYTHERAPY

Anxiety is a strong predictor of depression in people with MS via both direct and indirect pathways.
Read more »

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Opinion: Science and society must collaborate in setting research agenda









































A long-awaited trial of Dr. Paolo Zamboni's controversial treatment for multiple sclerosis known as "liberation therapy" has concluded the procedure is ineffective and should be avoided. NATHAN DENETTE / THE CANADIAN PRESS

Much anticipated initial results of the Canadian chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) clinical trial for multiple sclerosis (MS) were announced on March 8. The results demonstrated that the CCSVI procedure is ineffective compared to a neutral procedure in a group of 104 MS patients after 48 weeks. The outcome of the study at this time point serves as an important opportunity to reflect on the critical importance of the partnership between the public, scientists, and policymakers in setting research and funding agendas.
Read more »

Tuesday

 

MS: The sneaky disease: VIDEO


































Dr. Ron Tarrel from Noran Neurological Clinic and Abbott Northwestern explains some of the signs of MS.
(Photo: KARE 11)

To call MS a “sneaky” disease may be an understatement.
Read more »

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Alexa, Tell Me About MS: VIDEO





























Alexa, Amazon’s little voice-activated information box, has just received a multiple sclerosis infusion.
Read more »

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Monday

 

Natural Remedy Dos and Don’ts for MS























Before you spend money on natural remedies, learn which may be helpful for MS, and which likely are not.  THINKSTOCK

It’s tempting to hope that “natural” products might relieve MS symptoms, but which ones really do?

More and more people with MS are looking into so-called natural remedies — mostly herbs, vitamins, and supplements — as alternatives, or complements, to prescription drug treatment.
Read more »

 

WHO WANTS TO DATE SOMEONE WITH MS?
























I’m afraid to date.  I’m afraid to be rejected again. I’m afraid to be hurt again. I’m afraid to fall in love again. I’m afraid of the pain. I’m afraid to have to explain the embarrassing MS symptoms again.  I’m afraid of the embarrassment again. I’m afraid of the anxiety again. I’m even afraid of the excitement of it again. I’m afraid of the hope of it again.  I’m afraid of the beginning, the middle, and the end. I’m just really afraid to date again.
Read more »

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Sunday

 

Acorda Launches Interactive and Talking ‘MS Awareness Facts’ Alexa Service for March




















In recognition of MS awareness month, Acorda Therapeutics has launched its Alexa skill, called MS Awareness Facts.  The interactive voice-controlled service allows users to ask Amazon Alexa for information regarding MS and its debilitating symptoms.
Read more »

 

MS: Treatments to reverse myelin damage step closer with brain repair study































The new study takes treatment research into the area of reversing myelin damage. This picture shows myelin (in red) and myelin-producing cells (oligodendrocytes, in green).
Image credit: Queen's University Belfast

A breakthrough study looking at how the brain repairs itself could revolutionize treatments for multiple sclerosis. The research, performed on mice and tissue cultures, reveals for the first time that a type of cell involved in immune control also releases a protein that triggers regrowth of myelin.
Read more »

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Saturday

 

How I Still Smile as a College Student Living with MS




























My legs buzzed with tingles, and I felt stabbing pins-and-needles sensations. An odd tingling had pained the lower half of my body two days earlier and sent me to the ER. The medics in the ER didn’t find anything wrong, so I went home. But at home the sensations exploded until my back was wracked with pain, too. My worries about what caused the sensations mixed with the escalating pain in my body making me light-headed–even the lights hurt my skin. Something was wrong. My family rushed me back to the emergency room.
Read more »

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Discovery of T-cells’ Role in Myelin Regeneration Could Lead to Therapies That Mimic Processes




























Regulatory T-cells in the central nervous system trigger the maturation of stem cells that increase the production of myelin at injured neurons — a discovery that places the idea of regeneration in MS in a whole new light.
Read more »

Friday

 

What It Costs to Prevent an MS Relapse: New Report Reveals Some Shockers






















I’m often asked where I get much of the information I turn into our Life With Multiple Sclerosis blogs. I use a lot of the same patient advocacy organizations that you do. I also subscribe to some medical journals, and I get alerts from professional sites used by doctors and journalists.
Read more »

 

Key Cells in Bran Repair Can Revolutionize Treatment for MS: VIDEO




























FREEPORT, NY - APRIL 30: Tom Dennison, 62, of Rockville Centre, takes an  class at the Freeport Recreation Center on April 30,  in Freeport, New York. Tom has Multiple Sclerosis and takes the class to stay in the best shape he can. ( Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)

Scientists from the Queen's University in Belfast have specified key cells found in the immune system that are key players in brain repair. This cells could help revolutionize the treatment of neurological disorders such as MS, turret syndrome, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy.
Read more »

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Thursday

 

Study aims to improve telehealth services for MS patients




















Spencer Platt/Getty Images


Elizabeth Morrison-Banks, MD, a health sciences clinical professor at the University of California, Riverside, has received a $100,000 grant from Genentech to conduct a study in hopes of developing a telehealth program for individuals with MS.
Read more »

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MS Research Identifies Receptor That Facilitates Influx of T Cells into the Brain































MS is a neurodegenerative autoimmune disease in which the body’s own T cells attack the central nervous system (CNS). One major obstacle in this process comprises the so-called blood-brain barrier, which T cells have to cross before they can penetrate the brain. Researchers try to decipher this mechanism in order to develop new medications addressing this particular step of disease development. A group of researchers at the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has now discovered a mechanism that enables T cells to cross the blood-brain barrier more easily and to invade the CNS. Dr. Florian Kurschus of the Institute for Molecular Medicine at the Mainz University Medical Center and his team have discovered that a protein called EBI2 on the surface of T cells plays a significant role in this process. Their findings have recently been published in the journal Cell Reports.
Read more »

Wednesday

 

How Can I Find Out More About New Treatments for PPMS?
























Primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) doesn’t have a cure, but many options exist for managing the condition. Treatment focuses on alleviating symptoms while slowing the possibility of PPMS causing permanent disability.
Read more »

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Researchers make major brain repair discovery in fight against MS































Many mature oligos.
Credit: Image courtesy of Queen's University, Belfast

Queen's University Belfast scientists have discovered that specific cells from the immune system are key players in brain repair -- a fundamental breakthrough that could revolutionise the treatment of debilitating neurological disorders such as MS.
Read more »

Tuesday

 

Muscle Health Test Shows Importance of Exercise in MS

























A new test can show how exercise is benefiting people with MS and other neurological conditions.
Read more »

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Queen's University MS research 'a landmark'


























Dr. Yvonne Dombrowski

Research by scientists at Queen's University in Belfast could revolutionise life for people with MS.
Read more »

Monday

 

MS Advocates Hope Better Data Will Mean Better Care





















The practice of collecting data about how we MS patients go about living our lives, and then using that data to improve our patient care, seems to be gathering steam.
Read more »

 

Fear of the Phone: Speech Related Issues And MS





















By Devin Garlit

The many, varied symptoms of MS can make a lot of normal, often trivial, activities into massive hurdles for us.   I’ve discussed some of these before, like showering, shoveling snow, walking, and even sleeping. Today I was reminded of one I deal with often, but had gotten so used to that I had forgotten that it wasn’t normal until recently.  I’m referring to being able to talk on the phone.  This is such a basic thing that so many people do every day, but I avoid it like the plague because of a combination of MS-related speech and cognitive issues.  This all seems like a great reason to talk about some of the speech issues that those with MS might encounter.
Read more »

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Sunday

 

Unfair! MS pain causes fatigue, fatigue amplifies MS pain


















By TK Sellman

What’s a person with MS to do?
Read more »

 

Controversial 'liberation therapy' fails to treat MS











This is an MRI of a person with MS. White areas show permanent scarring caused by the disease.
Credit: University of British Columbia

Opening up narrowed veins from the brain and spinal cord is not effective in treating MS, according to a study led by the University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health.
Read more »

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Saturday

 

Is it an MS Relapse or a Pseudoexacerbation?

































Image Source: MULTIPLESCLEROSISNEWSTODAY

The symptoms of MS – muscle weakness, tingling, muscle spasms, or vision difficulties – suddenly appear again: but is it a relapse or a pseudoexacerbation?
Read more »

 

Neurologist Bourdette Questions ACTH Medicare Costs in Interview with MS News Today










The sky-high costs to Medicare for prescriptions of the MS medication H.P. Acthar Gel,  as reported in Multiple Sclerosis News Today were highlighted at the Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in MS (ACTRIMS) 2017 Forum in Orlando recently.
Read more »


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